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Upper gastrointestinal series after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass for morbid obesity: effectiveness in leakage detection. A systematic review of the literature

The aim of this study is to evaluate the results of routine and selective postoperative upper gastrointestinal series (UGIS) after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) for morbid obesity in different published series to assessing its utility and cost-effectiveness. A search in PubMed's MEDLINE was performed for English-spoken articles published from January 2002 to December 2012. Keywords used were upper GI series, RYGB, and obesity. Only cases of anastomotic leaks were considered. A total of 22 studies have been evaluated, 15 recommended a selective use of postoperative UGIS. No differences in leakage detection or in clinical benefit between routine and selective approaches were found. Tachycardia and respiratory distress represent the best criteria to perform UGIS for early diagnosis of anastomotic leak after a RYGB.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2014

Referral Guidelines for Suspected Cancer in Adults and Children [Internet]

The guideline is divided into sections which cover in detail specific topics relating to twelve groups of cancers: lung, upper gastrointestinal cancers, lower gastrointestinal cancers, breast cancer, gynaecological cancers, urological cancers, haematological cancers, skin cancers, head and neck including oral cancers, brain/central nervous system cancers, bone and sarcoma, and children’s and young people’s cancers.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - Clinical Governance Research and Development Unit (CGRDU), Department of Health Sciences, University of Leicester.

Version: June 2005
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Systematic reviews of the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of proton pump inhibitors in acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding

Upper gastrointestinal (UGI) haemorrhage is a major cause of morbidity, mortality and medical care costs, with peptic ulcer (PU) being the most frequent source of bleeding.

NIHR Health Technology Assessment programme: Executive Summaries - NIHR Journals Library.

Version: 2007

Left ventricular assist devices and gastrointestinal bleeding: a narrative review of case reports and case series

BACKGROUND: The use of left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) has become a state-of-the-art therapy for advanced cardiac heart failure; however, multiple reports in the literature describe an increased risk for gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding in these patients. We characterized this association by reviewing recent studies on this topic.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2013

Making Health Care Safer II: An Updated Critical Analysis of the Evidence for Patient Safety Practices

To review important patient safety practices for evidence of effectiveness, implementation, and adoption.

Evidence Reports/Technology Assessments - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: March 2013

Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors Treatment (PDQ®): Health Professional Version

Expert-reviewed information summary about the treatment of gastrointestinal carcinoid tumors.

PDQ Cancer Information Summaries [Internet] - National Cancer Institute (US).

Version: January 16, 2015

Optimizing Health System Use of Medical Isotopes and Other Imaging Modalities [Internet]

The purpose of this project was to provide national guidance on the optimal use of 99mTc during a situation of reduced supply. To accomplish this, our objective at CADTH was:

Optimal Use Report - Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health.

Version: 2012
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Venous Thromboembolism: Reducing the Risk of Venous Thromboembolism (Deep Vein Thrombosis and Pulmonary Embolism) in Patients Admitted to Hospital

Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a term used to include the formation of a blood clot (a thrombus) in a vein which may dislodge from its site of origin to travel in the blood, a phenomenon called embolism. A thrombus most commonly occurs in the deep veins of the legs; this is called deep vein thrombosis. A dislodged thrombus that travels to the lungs is known as a pulmonary embolism.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Clinical Guideline Centre – Acute and Chronic Conditions (UK).

Version: 2010
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Clinical Effectiveness and Cost-Effectiveness of Imatinib Dose Escalation for the Treatment of Unresectable and/or Metastatic Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumours that have Progressed on Treatment at a Dose of 400 Mg/Day: A Systematic Review and Economic Evaluation

Imatinib dose escalation is advocated for gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST) treatment, but its effectiveness compared with sunitinib and best supportive care (BSC) after failure at the 400 mg/day dose is unknown.

Health Technology Assessment - NIHR Journals Library.

Version: June 2011

Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors Treatment (PDQ®): Patient Version

Expert-reviewed information summary about the treatment of Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors.

PDQ Cancer Information Summaries [Internet] - National Cancer Institute (US).

Version: April 17, 2014

Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors Treatment (PDQ®): Patient Version

Expert-reviewed information summary about the treatment of gastrointestinal carcinoid tumors.

PDQ Cancer Information Summaries [Internet] - National Cancer Institute (US).

Version: January 16, 2015

Gastrointestinal Complications (PDQ®): Patient Version

Expert-reviewed information summary about constipation, impaction, bowel obstruction, and diarrhea as complications of cancer or its treatment. The management of these problems is discussed.

PDQ Cancer Information Summaries [Internet] - National Cancer Institute (US).

Version: December 11, 2014

Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors Treatment (PDQ®): Health Professional Version

Expert-reviewed information summary about the treatment of Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors

PDQ Cancer Information Summaries [Internet] - National Cancer Institute (US).

Version: January 20, 2015

Gastrointestinal Complications (PDQ®): Health Professional Version

Expert-reviewed information summary about constipation, impaction, bowel obstruction, and diarrhea as complications of cancer or its treatment. The management of these problems is discussed.

PDQ Cancer Information Summaries [Internet] - National Cancer Institute (US).

Version: August 28, 2014

The Management of Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms in Men [Internet]

The guideline covers men (18 and over) with a clinical working diagnosis of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). Options for conservative, pharmacological, surgical, and complementary or alternative treatments are considered in terms of clinical and cost effectiveness.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Clinical Guideline Centre (UK).

Version: 2010
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Respiratory Tract Infections - Antibiotic Prescribing: Prescribing of Antibiotics for Self-Limiting Respiratory Tract Infections in Adults and Children in Primary Care

Respiratory tract infection (RTI) is defined as any infectious disease of the upper or lower respiratory tract. Upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs) include the common cold, laryngitis, pharyngitis/tonsillitis, acute rhinitis, acute rhinosinusitis and acute otitis media. Lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) include acute bronchitis, bronchiolitis, pneumonia and tracheitis. Antibiotics are commonly prescribed for RTIs in adults and children in primary care. General practice consultation rates in England and Wales show that a quarter of the population will visit their GP because of an RTI each year (Ashworth et al. 2005). RTIs are the reason for 60% of all antibiotic prescribing in general practice, and this constitutes a significant cost to the NHS. Annual prescribing costs for acute cough alone exceed £15 million (Lindbaek 2006).

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (UK).

Version: July 2008

Urinary Tract Infection in Children: Diagnosis, Treatment and Long-term Management

In the past 30–50 years, the natural history of urinary tract infection (UTI) in children has changed as a result of the introduction of antibiotics and improvements in health care. This change has contributed to uncertainty about the most appropriate and effective way to diagnose and treat UTI in children and whether or not investigations and follow-up are justified.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Women's and Children's Health (UK).

Version: August 2007
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Faecal Incontinence: The Management of Faecal Incontinence in Adults

For many people faecal incontinence is the result of a complex interplay of contributing factors, many of which can co-exist. Some may be relatively simple to reverse.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Acute Care (UK).

Version: 2007
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Closing the Quality Gap: Revisiting the State of the Science (Vol. 6: Prevention of Healthcare-Associated Infections)

To update the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) Evidence Report Closing the Quality Gap: A Critical Analysis of Quality Improvement Strategies: Volume 6–Prevention of Healthcare-Associated Infections on quality improvement (QI) strategies to increase adherence to preventive interventions and/or reduce infection rates for central line–associated bloodstream infections (CLABSI), ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP), surgical site infections (SSI), and catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTI).

Evidence Reports/Technology Assessments - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: November 2012
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Sedation in Children and Young People: Sedation for Diagnostic and Therapeutic Procedures in Children and Young People [Internet]

Many children present to hospitals and dental clinics needing effective sedation or anaesthesia for painful or distressing diagnostic or therapeutic procedures. There are many sedation techniques available but there is insufficient guidance on which techniques are effective and what resources are required to deliver them safely. Sedation is not always effective enough and will occasionally require the procedure to be delayed until the child can be anaesthetised perhaps in another healthcare setting or on another day. Consequently sedation failure is both distressing for the child and has major NHS cost implications. Excessive doses of sedation can cause unintended loss of consciousness and dangerous hypoxia. In comparison, planned anaesthesia is effective, but may have resource implications. The need for sedation or anaesthesia will depend upon the type of procedure. Some types of procedures are very common and healthcare providers and practitioners need to understand whether sedation or anaesthesia is the most cost effective method of managing them

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Clinical Guideline Centre (UK).

Version: December 2010
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Medical Encyclopedia

  • Drug Class Review: Newer Antihistamines: Final Report Update 2 [Internet]
    Antihistamines inhibit the effects of histamine at H1 receptors. They have a number of clinical indications including allergic conditions (e.g., rhinitis, dermatoses, atopic dermatitis, contact dermatitis, allergic conjunctivitis, hypersensitivity reactions to drugs, mild transfusion reactions, and urticaria), chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU), motion sickness, vertigo, and insomnia.
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Systematic Reviews in PubMed

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