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Results: 4

Gastrointestinal Complications (PDQ®): Patient Version

Expert-reviewed information summary about constipation, impaction, bowel obstruction, and diarrhea as complications of cancer or its treatment. The management of these problems is discussed.

PDQ Cancer Information Summaries [Internet] - National Cancer Institute (US).

Version: December 11, 2014

Interventions for treating postpartum constipation

Women may experience constipation during the postpartum period. Consipation is defined as a functional bowel disorder that is characterised by pain and discomfort, straining, hard lumpy stools and a sense of incomplete bowel evacuation. Haemorrhoids, pain at the episiotomy site, effects of pregnancy hormones and iron supplementation can increase the risk of postpartum constipation; as can damage to the anal sphincter or pelvic floor muscles during childbirth. It is a source of concern to the new mother who is recovering from the stress of delivery. The discomfort does not only affect the mother's health, but also impacts on the new baby's well‐being, since it needs most of the mother's attention at this time.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2014

Phlebotonics for haemorrhoids

Haemorrhoids are among the most common benign anorectal pathologies which usually manifest with the common symptoms and signs of bleeding, pain, pruritus, swelling and discharge. The prevalence can vary from 4.4% in the general population to 36.4% in general practice. However their true prevalence will inevitably be underestimated due to the under‐reporting of these symptoms. Medical and conservative management with high‐fibre diets, stool softeners and laxatives are the preferred treatments for grade I‐II haemorrhoids whereas surgical procedures such as haemorrhoidectomy are reserved for the more severe forms of haemorrhoids.  Phlebotonics are a heterogeneous class of drugs used to treat haemorrhoidal disease in the less severe stages of first and second‐degree haemorrhoids, and during the thrombosis episodes. Although their true mechanism of action has not been well established, they are associated with strengthening of blood vessel walls, increasing venous tone, lymphatic drainage and normalizing capillary permeability. We considered twenty four studies for inclusion in this review. This review identified twenty randomised controlled trials enrolling a total of (2334) participants which compared an intervention using phlebotonics with a control intervention. Of these twenty studies, one study compared phlebotonics with a medical intervention and another with rubber band ligation. Of the remaining four trials, we identified two trials which compared phlebotonics with each other, one trial which compared phlebotonics with herbal therapy and one trial which compared phlebotonics with infrared photocoagulation. The trials obtained did not show any significant adverse events or side‐effects from the use of phlebotonics. The studies demonstrated a beneficial effect of phlebotonics in treating the symptoms and signs of haemorrhoidal disease as well as symptom relief post‐haemorrhoidectomy.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2012

Nutrition in Cancer Care (PDQ®): Patient Version

Expert-reviewed information summary about the causes and management of nutritional problems that occur in patients with cancer.

PDQ Cancer Information Summaries [Internet] - National Cancer Institute (US).

Version: December 5, 2014

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