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About - Prednisolone

By mouth: Treats many diseases and conditions, especially problems related to inflammation. Also treats flare-ups of ongoing illnesses, such as colitis, multiple sclerosis, or arthritis. This medicine is a corticosteroid.

By injection: Treats many diseases and conditions, especially problems related to inflammation. This medicine is a steroid. This product is no longer available in the US but may be available in other countries.

Into the eye: Treats eye swelling, itching, and discomfort caused by allergies, injury, or other problems.

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Results: 1 to 20 of 250

A systematic review and economic model of the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of docetaxel in combination with prednisone or prednisolone for the treatment of hormone-refractory metastatic prostate cancer

Prostate cancer is the most common male cancer, excluding non-melanoma skin cancer, in the UK, accounting for around 13% of male cancer deaths. In 2001, there were 26,027 new cases in England and 1746 in Wales, giving age-standardised incidence rates of 89.8 and 92.6 per 100,000 men, respectively. The majority of patients are diagnosed with early disease and have a good prognosis. However, approximately 22% of cases will be diagnosed with advanced or metastatic disease, with an additional 25% developing metastases throughout the course of the disease. The majority of prostate cancers initially respond to hormone therapy, with a median response duration in metastatic disease of around 18 months. However, in most patients the cancer will become resistant to hormonal treatment and will progress. After developing hormone-resistant disease, survival is not expected to exceed 9-12 months. Treatment for metastatic hormone-refractory prostate cancer (mHRPC) is palliative and current advice issued by the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence states that chemotherapy should be considered and trials of chemotherapy supported, and palliative radiotherapy should also be considered as a treatment option. The use of chemotherapy for mHRPC is widespread in the UK. New trials assessing the effectiveness for the treatment of mHRPC of docetaxel, which is licensed for use in combination with prednisone/prednisolone in the UK, have emerged. The cost of a course of up to 10 cycles of docetaxel at the recommended dose is approximately £11,000. Therefore the evidence must be appraised by a systematic review and economic model.

NIHR Health Technology Assessment programme: Executive Summaries - NIHR Journals Library.

Version: 2007

Prednisolone combined with adjunctive immunosuppression is not superior to prednisolone alone in terms of efficacy and safety in giant cell arteritis: meta-analysis

To conduct a meta-analysis of published data of the effectiveness of drug treatment in giant cell arteritis (GCA) to provide evidence to support the optimal use of glucocorticoids (GCs) and adjunct therapy. MEDLINE, CENTRAL and EMBASE searches were used to identify randomised control trials on the treatment of GCA. Studies included were trials in which: (1) the participants were classified as having GCA by the 1990 ACR criteria or biopsy proven disease; (2) parallel-group randomised control of at least 16 weeks duration had been conducted with at least 20 participants; (3) the design included either alternative adjunct immunosuppressant regimens, alternative GCs dosing or routes of administration; and (4) outcome data was included on either relapse rates or rates of infection. One thousand eight hundred thirty-six articles were retrieved, of which only 37 met the primary inclusion criteria. Sixteen of these studies reported some information about the GCs or adjuvant regimen used. Only ten studies were of sufficient quality to be included in the meta-analysis. Together these comprised 638 participants of which 72 % were female. Three studies compared various GCs regimens, with two comparing IV GCs, the latter showing a marginal benefit with respect to relapse (risk ratio (RR) = 0.78, 95 % CI = 0.54 to 1.12) but a greater risk of infection (RR = 1.58, 95 % CI = 0.90 to 2.78). Another three used methotrexate as an adjunctive agent and showed marginal benefit with respect to relapse (RR = 0.85, 95 % CI = 0.66 to 1.11). The remaining four trials compared prednisolone to dapsone, infliximab, adalimumab and hydroxychloroquine, respectively. There are various clinical trials of varying quality. The results from this meta-analysis show that the use of adjunct agents is not associated with improved outcome.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2014

Antiviral drugs for sudden hearing loss (without known cause)

Idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSHL) is sudden loss of hearing where clinical assessment has failed to reveal a cause. Patients may also suffer from additional symptoms such as tinnitus (a background ringing noise), together with dizziness and a sensation of fullness in the ear. Prompt investigation is essential to identify and treat the hearing impairment. In a large proportion of patients, however, no cause can be found.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2012

The long‐term use of anti‐inflammatory corticosteroids for treating multiple sclerosis

Multiple sclerosis is an inflammatory disease affecting the brain and spinal cord. It results in episodes of neurological deficit which recover (relapses) as well as accumulation of sustained disability with the passage of time. Corticosteroids are potent anti‐inflammatory drugs. It is postulated that long‐term use of steroids may reduce the accumulation of disability. The reviewers found three studies addressing this issue. A meta‐analysis showed a trend towards a beneficial effect of long‐term corticosteroids on accumulation of disability; however only two small studies contributed to this result. It was not possible to reliably comment on the effect of long‐term corticosteroids on the frequency of relapses. Side effects were poorly documented. Therefore rigorous randomised controlled trials of this treatment are warranted.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2009

Interventions for growth failure in childhood Crohn's disease

Growth failure occurs in 15‐40% of children with Crohn's disease. Growth in affected children is influenced by the disease process itself and by some treatments. Management in children differs from that in adults because of the required emphasis on achieving optimum growth and pubertal development. The aim of this review was to evaluate the effectiveness of various treatments for growth failure in childhood Crohn's disease. Three randomized controlled trials were identified. One trial did not show any benefit for linear growth with 6‐mercaptopurine treatment compared to placebo among children being treated with steroids. The other two trials looked at nutritional treatment (elemental feedings) versus steroids (prednisolone). Both trials showed a statistically significant benefit for height velocity standard deviation scores with nutritional treatment. However, these results need to be confirmed by large, multi‐centre, randomized controlled trials of therapeutic interventions in pre‐pubertal children with Crohn's disease. These trials should use growth as an outcome measure. In conclusion, more research is needed to identify effective treatments for growth failure in childhood Crohn's disease.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2008

Prevention and treatment regimens for recurrent corneal erosion

In recurrent corneal erosion repeated episodes of breakdown of the corneal surface produce disabling eye symptoms and predispose the cornea (the transparent part at the front of the eye) to infection. Recurrent corneal erosions may happen after trauma to the cornea. Management may be required to prevent the recurrence of the erosions following corneal trauma or once the diagnosis is made, or both. Most episodes of recurrent corneal erosion resolve with simple medical therapy such as topical eye drops and ointment. When such simple measures fail or recurrences become too frequent, alternative treatment strategies are required. This review included seven trials with a total of 443 participants. The trials were conducted in Germany, People's Republic of China, Japan, Sweden and three in the UK. The quality of the trials was poor and the authors found the level of evidence insufficient for the development of management guidelines. There was limited evidence that oral tetracycline or topical prednisolone, or both, and excimer laser ablation, may be effective treatments for recurrent corneal erosion. More good‐quality randomised controlled trials are needed to guide the management of recurrent corneal erosion.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2013

Corticosteroids for managing people with tuberculous meningitis

Tuberculous meningitis is a serious form of tuberculosis that affects the meninges that cover the brain and spinal cord, causing headache, coma and death. The clinical outcome is often poor even when people with tuberculous meningitis are treated with antituberculous drugs.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2016

Corticosteroid regimens for treatment of acute and chronic graft versus host disease (GvHD) after allogenic stem cell transplantation

Corticosteroids are commonly used to treat acute and chronic graft‐versus‐host disease (GvHD) but their effect on length and quality of life of patients has not been studied systematically. In this systematic review, we tried to compare the effect of treatment regimens used for GvHD in the absence and presence of corticosteroids, or with different doses of corticosteroids. After searching relevant sources, we located only two studies that met our criteria to be included in the study. Their results are described in detail in the text of the review. In brief, these studies are in favor earlier remission and slightly better outcome in patients but more evidence is needed in this field.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2010

No evidence to support or refute glucocorticosteroids for patients with primary biliary cirrhosis

Primary biliary cirrhosis is a chronic progressive cholestatic liver disease of presumed autoimmune aetiology. The clinical course might be improved by glucocorticosteroids. Only two small randomised clinical trials on this topic were identified. The trials were not large enough in terms of sample size or length of follow up to allow changes in mortality to be adequately evaluated. Glucocorticosteroids were associated with improvement in serum markers of inflammation and liver histology, both of which were of uncertain clinical significance. Glucocorticosteroids were also associated with adverse events, including reduced bone mineral density. Further trials are necessary if the effectiveness of glucocorticosteroids is to be properly evaluated.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2008

Interventions for untreated patients with AIDS‐associated non‐Hodgkin's lymphoma

Lymphoma is a cancer of the lymphatic system. There are two general types: Hodgkin's disease (HD) and non‐Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). Non‐Hodgkin's lymphoma is the most common AIDS‐defining malignancy in HIV‐infected patients. The most frequent clinical presentations of NHL during AIDS are systemic illness with the compromise of the primary central nervous system and with primary effusion. In people with HIV infection, most lymphomas have originated in an aggressive B‐cell precursor and have a high‐to‐intermediate histology grade. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of different interventions for treating AIDS‐associated NHL found unclear evidence for efficacy and safety.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2009

Hypothalamic‐pituitary‐adrenal (HPA) axis suppression after treatment with glucocorticoid therapy for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) is the most frequent type of cancer to occur in children. Glucocorticoids, like prednisone and dexamethasone, play a major role in the treatment of ALL. However, high‐dose glucocorticoids can cause HPA axis suppression. Suppression of the HPA axis resulting in inadequate cortisol production may cause an impaired response to stressors (for example trauma, surgery, or inflammation) and an inadequate host defence against infections, and remains a cause of morbidity and death in childhood. The occurrence and duration of HPA axis suppression after glucocorticoid therapy for childhood ALL are unclear.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2015

Are shorter courses of systemic steroids as effective as conventional longer courses in the treatment of patients with flare‐ups of COPD?

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), which includes emphysema and chronic bronchitis, is a long‐term lung condition that is commonly associated with smoking. Patients with COPD may experience flare‐ups (exacerbations), often precipitated by infection, in which symptoms such as breathlessness, cough and phlegm become markedly worse, and extra treatment or admission to hospital is required.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2015

A review of the use of drugs that suppress the immune system (immunosuppressants) in myasthenia gravis.

Myasthenia gravis (MG) is caused by antibodies produced by the immune system that impair the transmission of nerve impulses to muscles. This results in muscle weakness that characteristically fluctuates. About one person in every 10 000 ‐ 50 000 develops MG each year. The natural history of the disorder is typically a series of exacerbations and remissions. Severe attacks can be life‐threatening because of weakness of muscles involved in swallowing causing choking, and chest muscles causing difficulty with breathing. In MG, immunosuppressant drugs act mainly by reducing the production of antibodies.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2009

Inhaled versus oral steroids for adults with chronic asthma

Inhaled corticosteroids form the first choice for preventative treatment of asthma, but they remain expensive for health economies in developing countries. Oral prednisolone is very much cheaper. In this review, we found that, in the management of adults with chronic asthma, a daily dose of prednisolone 7.5 mg/day appears to be equivalent to a moderate to high dose of inhaled steroids (300‐2000 mcg/day). Side effects may be present even with low doses of prednisolone, so if there is no alternative to oral steroids, the lowest effective dose should be prescribed. These findings may be use in developing countries where inhaled steroids are not widely available.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2008

Corticosteroids versus placebo and NSAIDs for rheumatoid arthritis

Corticosteroid drugs can relieve inflammation, and in high doses they have a dramatic effect on the symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis. They are used only temporarily, however, because of serious adverse effects during long‐term use. The review found that corticosteroids in low doses are very effective. They are more effective than usual anti‐arthritis medications (non‐steroidal anti‐inflammatory drugs, or NSAIDs). The risk of harms needs to be considered, however, especially the risk of fractures and infections.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2009

Decompressive surgery for treating nerve damage in leprosy

Leprosy is a chronic infectious disease. Leprosy bacteria cause damage to skin and peripheral nerves which may result in nerve function impairment and disability. Decompressive surgery is used for treating nerve damage although its effect is uncertain. Two randomised controlled trials (RCTs) were included in the review and examined the added benefit of surgery over prednisolone for treatment of nerve damage of less than six months duration. Both trials were at high risk of bias. Two years from the start there was very low quality evidence of no significant difference in nerve function improvement between people treated with surgery plus prednisolone or with prednisolone alone. Adverse effects of decompressive surgery were not adequately described. No additional trials were identified when searches were updated in 2010 and 2012. Decompressive surgery is used for treating nerve damage in leprosy but the available evidence from RCTs is of very low quality and does not show a significant added benefit of surgery over steroid treatment alone. Well‐designed RCTs are needed to establish the effectiveness of the combination of surgery and medical treatment compared to medical treatment alone.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2012

Corticosteroids for the treatment of parasitic eosinophilic meningitis

Eosinophilic meningitis is an inflammation of the membrane covering the brain, the causes of which can be broadly categorised into infectious and non‐infectious. Among the infectious aetiologies, Angiostrongylus cantonensis, a rat lung worm, is the major cause of eosinophilic meningitis. It occurs principally in South‐East Asia and throughout the Pacific basin. However, this parasite has spread beyond the Pacific basin and is now found in regions of North America due to infected ship rats. Severe headache, which is self limiting, is the main complaint. The headache is probably due to an immune response to the dead parasites. Other signs and symptoms include neck stiffness and pain, visual disturbances, nausea, vomiting, paraesthesia and hyperaesthesia. Corticosteroids are drugs that reduce inflammation, which can occur in eosinophilic meningitis due to dead larvae.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2015

Use of oral steroids for cystic fibrosis

Cystic fibrosis causes frequent lung infection and the airways become blocked with mucus. This in turn leads to inflammation, which causes more lung damage and more mucus to be produced. Corticosteroids are strong drugs given to treat this inflammation. The review includes three trials; one for 12 weeks and two with four‐year follow up. We could not combine any data. Trials showed that oral steroids of 1mg/kg to 2 mg/kg (prednisolone equivalent) given every other day seemed to slow the advance of lung disease. However, there are serious adverse effects such as cataracts and the slowing of growth at the higher dose. These led to one trial stopping early. Follow‐up data show that catch‐up growth started two years after treatment ceased. Treatment must use the lowest effective dose and the shortest duration of therapy to reduce the risk of a permanent effect on growth. A dose of 1 mg/kg on alternate days might be considered for up to 24 months, but close attention should be paid to adverse effects. We do not expect any further trials of this treatment to be undertaken, so we do not plan to continue to regularly update the review. However, if any new information is published, we will include this when it is available. This is an update of a previously published review.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2016

Corticosteroids for treating nerve damage in leprosy

Leprosy is a long‐term infectious disease. Leprosy bacteria cause damage to the skin and peripheral nerves (nerves outside the brain and spinal cord). This damage can stop nerves from working normally and cause disability. Corticosteroids, especially prednisolone, are often used to treat nerve damage in leprosy, but their long‐term effect is uncertain.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2016

Interventions to treat erythema nodosum leprosum, a complication of leprosy

Leprosy remains a public health issue in poorer parts of the world. In 2007 there were approximately 255,000 new cases reported worldwide. Leprosy (or Hansen's disease) is a chronic infectious disease. The skin and peripheral nerves of people with leprosy contain leprosy bacteria. Leprosy can be cured with a combination of antibiotics. The immune system plays an important role in leprosy and determines if and how the disease will develop. The response of the immune system to the antigens of the leprosy bacteria may cause periods of inflammation in the skin and nerves, called reactions. Reactions are the main cause of acute nerve damage and disability in leprosy and occur in about one third of people with leprosy. One type of reaction is erythema nodosum leprosum (ENL), a serious and often chronic complication of leprosy caused by the immune system. People with ENL have red, painful swellings in the skin and often feel ill due to fever and general malaise. There are several treatments for ENL, including the oral drugs prednisolone, thalidomide, and clofazimine. We undertook a systematic review on this topic as it was not clear which treatments were most beneficial.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2012

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