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Results: 9

Antenatal phenobarbital for reducing neonatal jaundice after red cell isoimmunization

Inadequate evidence on antenatal use of phenobarbital for reducing jaundice in babies born to mothers whose blood is incompatible with the baby's blood.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2009

Phenobarbital prior to preterm birth for preventing neonatal periventricular haemorrhage

Evidence does not support phenobarbital treatment to women giving birth before 34 weeks to decrease the risk of bleeding into the babies' brains.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2011

Postnatal phenobarbital for the prevention of intraventricular haemorrhage in preterm infants

Large bleeds in the centre of the brain can cause disability or death in preterm babies. Unstable blood pressure and blood flow to the brain are believed to cause intraventricular haemorrhage (IVH) (bleeding into the fluid‐filled cavities of the brain (ventricles). The drug phenobarbital is believed to stabilise blood pressure and, therefore, potentially help prevent IVH. The review of trials found that there was not enough evidence that postnatal phenobarbital is effective in preventing IVH. Furthermore, phenobarbital suppresses breathing in infants who are breathing spontaneously, causing a need for mechanical ventilation.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2013

Antiepileptic drugs for preventing seizures in people with brain tumors

Up to 60% of people with brain tumors may present with seizures, or may have a seizure for the first time after diagnosis or neurosurgery. The risk of a seizure varies with the tumor type and its location in the brain. Seizures are an added burden with a negative impact on quality of life, affecting activities of daily living, independence, work, and driving. Many doctors believe that antiepileptic drugs are effective and necessary to prevent seizures (seizure prophylaxis), but this practice has been put into question. Antiepileptic drugs can have adverse effects and they interact with steroids and chemotherapy.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2009

Anticonvulsants for neonates with seizures

Plain language summary will be included with future review update.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2009

Therapeutic monitoring of antiepileptic drugs for epilepsy

No evidence to support routine therapeutic monitoring of antiepileptic drugs in the treatment of epilepsy.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2010

AEDs as prophylaxis for post‐craniotomy seizures

Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) have been used in trials to prevent postoperative seizures occurring in patients with no history of epilepsy prior to undergoing neurosurgery. Several trials have compared different AED treatments while others have compared AEDs to a placebo or no treatment group. This review examined the differences between the AED treatments in relation to number of patients experiencing seizures, number of patient deaths and number of adverse effects experienced following craniotomy surgery (a type of brain surgery most commonly used to remove brain tumours). No evidence was found to suggest that prophylactic AED treatments are effective in reducing occurrences of postoperative seizures, deaths or adverse effects. Further trials of good quality are needed to validate this finding.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2013

Anti‐epileptic drugs for preventing seizures in patients with long‐term bleeding around the brain (subdural haematoma)

Chronic subdural haematoma (CSH) is a serious condition in which blood collects under the thickest membrane that surrounds the brain, known as the dura mater. CSH is usually caused by minor head injuries in which a vein has torn, and this happens in particular in older patients and patients with other brain problems. A CSH may cause seizures which can be dangerous. Some doctors give patients anti‐epileptic drugs such as phenytoin or phenobarbital to try to prevent seizures. However, most patients with CSH will not have seizures and anti‐epileptic drugs can have serious side effects.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2013

Vitamin K prior to preterm birth for preventing neonatal periventricular haemorrhage

Vitamin K given to women before a very preterm birth does not decrease the risk of bleeding in the brain and associated neurological injury in babies born very preterm.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2011

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