Home > Search Results
  • Added to PubMed Health

    clear
    • Custom range...

Results: 3

Hepatitis A immunisation in persons not previously exposed to hepatitis A

Hepatitis A is a common, contagious viral disease in many low‐income countries. It is estimated that world wide, around 1.5 million people are affected each year. The hepatitis A virus is limited to man and several species of non‐human primates. It is transmitted primarily by faecal‐oral spread from person to person, or through ingestion of contaminated food or water. Since 1995, hepatitis A vaccines have been used to prevent hepatitis A in people not yet exposed to the hepatitis A virus. Only three of the included trials were considered to be at low risk of bias; that is, free from overestimation of benefits and underestimation of harm due to systemic errors. In persons not previously exposed to hepatitis A infection, hepatitis A vaccination with inactivated or live attenuated hepatitis A vaccines had a clear effect on reducing the risk of developing clinically apparent hepatitis A. The review also found that hepatitis A vaccines significantly reduce the risk of lacking protective antibodies against hepatitis A. The inactivated vaccine appears to be relatively safe. There were insufficient data to draw any conclusions on production of protective antibodies and adverse events for live attenuated vaccines.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2012

Immunoglobulins (human serum immune gamma globulins) seem effective for prevention of hepatitis A

Hepatitis A is a common, contagious viral disease in low‐income countries. Hepatitis A is transmitted primarily by faecal‐oral spread from person to person. Passive immunoprophylaxis for hepatitis A using immunoglobulin preparations were essential for prevention before development of specific hepatitis A vaccine (active immunisation). This review concludes that immunoglobulins seem effective for preventing hepatitis A in both children and adults. However, the evidence, on which the conclusion is based, is not strong as the included trials appear to have risk of bias and their number is insufficient. Because there is a potential risk of blood‐borne diseases from immunoglobulins preparations, such as human immunodeficiency virus, and because of the availability of hepatitis A vaccine, the use of immunoglobulins has become limited. However, their use is still required in some specific populations, such as persons with compromised immune function, children under one year of age, or persons who have not developed a full response to vaccine immunisation. Future clinical trials should address the benefit and harm of immunoglobulins in these populations.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2010

Liver (Hepatocellular) Cancer Prevention (PDQ®): Patient Version

Expert-reviewed information summary about factors that may influence the risk of developing hepatocellular cancer and about research aimed at the prevention of this disease.

PDQ Cancer Information Summaries [Internet] - National Cancer Institute (US).

Version: June 7, 2013

Recent Activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...