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Comparing Fibromyalgia Drugs

How do drugs for fibromyalgia compare in improving symptoms?

PubMed Clinical Q&A [Internet] - National Center for Biotechnology Information (US).

Version: June 12, 2011

Comparing Antiepileptics for Bipolar Disorder, Migraines, Fibromyalgia, and Chronic Pain

How do antiepileptics compare in treating bipolar disorder?

PubMed Clinical Q&A [Internet] - National Center for Biotechnology Information (US).

Version: October 1, 2010

Phenytoin for neuropathic pain and fibromyalgia in adults

Nerves which have been damaged by injury or disease can continue to produce pain. This type of pain is called neuropathic pain. Some antiepileptic medications can help neuropathic pain. Phenytoin is an antiepileptic medication, and the aim of this review was to assess how effective phenytoin is for neuropathic pain and fibromyalgia. We identified no good quality studies of phenytoin used in this situation. When used to treat epilepsy, phenytoin can cause potentially troublesome adverse events, affecting nervous tissue, the blood, and unborn children. Based on current evidence, phenytoin cannot be recommended for treating neuropathic pain. Other antiepileptic drugs such as pregabalin, gabapentin, and carbamazepine have been shown to be of value in neuropathic pain.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2015

Clonazepam for neuropathic pain and fibromyalgia in adults

Nerves which have been damaged by injury or disease can continue to produce pain. This type of pain is called neuropathic pain. Some antiepileptic medications can help neuropathic pain. Clonazepam is an antiepileptic medication, and the aim of this review was to assess how effective clonazepam is for neuropathic pain and fibromyalgia. We identified no good quality studies of clonazepam used in this situation. Dependence and tolerance may occur with prolonged use, although it is less of a problem with clonazepam than many other drugs from the same class (benzodiazepines), and behavioural disinhibition has been reported in a few patients with psychiatric problems. Based on current evidence, clonazepam cannot be recommended for treating neuropathic pain. Other antiepileptic drugs such as pregabalin, gabapentin, and carbamazepine have been shown to be of value in neuropathic pain.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2014

Valproic acid and sodium valproate for neuropathic pain and fibromyalgia

Neuropathic pain is caused by nerve damage, often accompanied by changes in the central nervous sytem, and fibromyalgia is a related complex pain syndrome. Many people with these conditions are disabled with moderate or severe pain for many years. Conventional analgesics are usually not effective treatment options. In light of the fact that there are similarities between the pathophysiologic and biochemical mechanisms observed in epilepsy and in neuropathic pain, it is not surprising that antiepileptic agents can be used to treat neuropathic pain. The aim of this review was to investigate the efficacy and adverse events associated with use of sodium valproate and valproic acid for the treatment of chronic neuropathic pain and fibromyalgia. We identified three relevant studies, two in diabetic neuropathy and a third in post‐herpetic neuralgia. Two of the three studies report significantly greater reduction in pain for valproate than placebo, but studies were small (≤ 45 participants) and provided insufficient data for pooled analysis, and the methods of analysis used may have overestimated treatment effect. Adverse events such as nausea, sedation, drowsiness, vertigo, and abnormal liver function are more common with valproate than placebo, but these studies were unsuitable to allow for a comprehensive assessment of harm.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2014

Multidisciplinary rehabilitation for fibromyalgia and musculoskeletal pain in working age adults

Non‐malignant musculoskeletal pain is an increasing problem in western countries. Fibromyalgia syndrome is an increasingly recognised chronic musculoskeletal disorder. The main purpose of this systematic review was to determine the effectiveness of multidisciplinary rehabilitation for fibromyalgia and wide spread musculoskeletal pain among working age adults. Patients included in the controlled trials in this review ranged in age from 18‐65 years. Seven studies, with 1050 patients were included. The effectiveness of multidisciplinary rehabilitation was graded limited, showing no quantifiable benefit for both fibromyalgia and widespread musculoskeletal pain.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2009

Lamotrigine (an antiepileptic drug) for chronic neuropathic pain or fibromyalgia

Neuropathic pain is pain coming from damaged nerves. It is different from pain messages carried along healthy nerves from damaged tissue (a fall, or cut, or arthritic knee). Neuropathic pain is treated by different medicines than pain from damaged tissue. Medicines like paracetamol or ibuprofen are not effective in neuropathic pain, while medicines that are sometimes used to treat depression or epilepsy can be very effective in some people with neuropathic pain. Our understanding of fibromyalgia (a condition of persistent, widespread pain and tenderness, sleep problems, and fatigue) is lacking, but fibromyalgia can respond to the same medicines as neuropathic pain.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2014

Monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) for fibromyalgia

This summary of a Cochrane review presents what we know from research about the effect of MAOIs for fibromyalgia (FM).

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2012

Antiepileptic drugs to treat neuropathic pain or fibromyalgia‐ an overview of Cochrane reviews

Neuropathic pain is pain coming from damaged nerves. It is different from pain messages carried along healthy nerves from damaged tissue (eg a fall, cut, or arthritic knee). Neuropathic pain is treated by different medicines than pain from damaged tissue. Medicines such as paracetamol or ibuprofen are probably not effective in neuropathic pain, while medicines that are sometimes used to treat depression or epilepsy can be very effective in some people with neuropathic pain. Our understanding of fibromyalgia (a condition of persistent, widespread pain and tenderness, sleep problems, and fatigue) is lacking, but fibromyalgia can respond to the same medicines as neuropathic pain.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2014

Amitriptyline for neuropathic pain and fibromyalgia in adults

The review set out to examine how well amitriptyline worked in treating neuropathic pain or fibromyalgia, where the definition of worked involved both a high level of pain relief and the ability to take the tablets over a longer time without side effects being intolerable. There were no studies that could provide an answer that was trustworthy or reliable, because most studies were relatively old, and used methods or reported results that we now recognise as making benefits seem better than they are. This is disappointing, but we can still make useful comments about the drug.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2012

Milnacipran for chronic neuropathic pain and fibromyalgia in adults

The aim of this review was to assess how effective milnacipran is for treating chronic neuropathic pain or fibromyalgia. We identified no studies using milnacipran in neuropathic pain, but five studies in fibromyalgia satisfied the inclusion criteria. Fibromyalgia is a complex pain syndrome, defined as widespread pain for longer than three months; the original diagnostic criteria involved pain on palpation at 11 or more of a number of specified tender points (Wolfe 1990), with later criteria including both widespread pain and symptom severity (Wolfe 2010). The studies included over 4000 participants treated with milnacipran 100 mg or 200 mg, or placebo, for eight to 24 weeks at the target dose. Overall study quality was good, although the method of analysis for our primary outcomes could overestimate treatment effect.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2012

Lacosamide for neuropathic pain and fibromyalgia in adults

Antiepileptic drugs like lacosamide are commonly used for treating neuropathic pain, usually defined as pain due to damage to nerves. This would include postherpetic neuralgia (persistent pain experienced in an area previously affected by shingles), painful diabetic neuropathy, nerve injury pain, phantom limb pain and trigeminal neuralgia; fibromyalgia also responds to some antiepileptic drugs. This type of pain can be severe and long‐lasting, is associated with lack of sleep, fatigue, depression and a reduced quality of life. This review included five studies in painful diabetic neuropathy (1863 participants) and one in fibromyalgia (159 participants). In people with painful diabetic neuropathy, lacosamide had only a modest effect, with a specific effect due to its use in 1 person in 10. This is a minor effect and may be an over‐estimate due to use of the last observation carried forward method for analysis. There was insufficient information in fibromyalgia to draw any conclusions about the effect of lacosamide. There was no significant difference between lacosamide and placebo for participants with any, or a serious, adverse event, but there were significantly more adverse event withdrawals with lacosamide. Regulatory authorities have not licensed lacosamide for treating pain based on evidence presently available.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2012

Exercise for fibromyalgia

‐ moderate intensity aerobic training for 12 weeks may improve overall well‐being and physical function; moderate intensity aerobic exercise probably leads to little or no difference in pain or tender points.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2008

Carbamazepine for chronic neuropathic pain and fibromyalgia in adults

Neuropathic pain is pain coming from damaged nerves. It is different from pain messages carried along healthy nerves from damaged tissue (a fall, or cut, or arthritic knee). Neuropathic pain is treated by different medicines than pain from damaged tissue. Medicines like paracetamol or ibuprofen are not effective in neuropathic pain, while medicines that are sometimes used to treat depression or epilepsy can be very effective in some people. Our understanding of fibromyalgia (a condition of persistent, widespread pain and tenderness, sleep problems, and fatigue) is lacking, but fibromyalgia can respond to the same medicines as neuropathic pain.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2014

Topiramate for treating neuropathic pain or fibromyalgia

Neuropathic pain is pain coming from damaged nerves. It is different from pain messages carried along healthy nerves from damaged tissue (for example from a fall, a cut, or arthritic knee). Neuropathic pain is treated by different medicines than pain from damaged tissue. Medicines like paracetamol or ibuprofen are not effective in treating neuropathic pain, while medicines that are sometimes used to treat depression or epilepsy can be very effective in some people with neuropathic pain. Our knowledge about fibromyalgia is even less advanced, but fibromyalgia can respond to the same medicines as neuropathic pain.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2013

Gabapentin for chronic neuropathic pain and fibromyalgia in adults

Neuropathic pain is pain coming from damaged nerves. It differs from pain messages carried along healthy nerves from damaged tissue (a fall, cut, or arthritic knee). Neuropathic pain is treated by different medicines than pain from damaged tissue. Medicines like paracetamol or ibuprofen are not effective in neuropathic pain, while medicines that are sometimes used to treat depression or epilepsy can be very effective in some people with neuropathic pain. Our understanding of fibromyalgia (a condition of persistent, widespread pain and tenderness, sleep problems, and fatigue) is poor, but fibromyalgia can respond to the same medicines as neuropathic pain.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2014

Serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors for fibromyalgia

Researchers in the Cochrane Collaboration conducted a review of research about the effects of serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) on fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS). After searching for all relevant studies, they found 10 studies with up to 6038 people. Their findings are summarized below.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2013

Oxycodone for neuropathic pain and fibromyalgia in adults

Neuropathic pain is pain coming from damaged nerves. It differs from pain messages carried along healthy nerves from damaged tissue (as in a fall, a cut, or an arthritic knee). Neuropathic pain is treated by different medicines than pain from damaged tissue. Medicines such as paracetamol and ibuprofen are not effective in neuropathic pain, while medicines that are sometimes used to treat epilepsy or depression can be very effective in some people with neuropathic pain. Our understanding of fibromyalgia (a condition of persistent, widespread pain and tenderness, sleep problems, and fatigue) is poor, but fibromyalgia can respond to the same medicines as neuropathic pain.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2014

Duloxetine for treating painful neuropathy, chronic pain or fibromyalgia

Duloxetine is a drug used to treat depression and urinary urge incontinence (leakage of urine) and it can be also be useful for certain types of pain. Pain can arise spontaneously when there is damage to nerves that carry pain information to the brain (neuropathic pain). When this damage is to nerves outside the spinal cord it is called a peripheral neuropathy. Another type of pain, nociceptive pain, occurs when the nerves sense damage to another tissue (for example, a pinprick in the skin). Some pain is of unclear origin and occurs without apparent nerve or tissue damage. This sort of pain happens, for example, in fibromyalgia. The objective of this review was to assess the benefits and harms of duloxetine for treating painful neuropathy and chronic pain of all sorts.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2014

Interventions focusing on the link between the mind and body for adults with fibromyalgia

People with fibromyalgia have chronic, widespread body pain, and often have fatigue (feeling tired), stiffness, depression and problems sleeping.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2015

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