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Kounis syndrome following beta-lactam antibiotic use: review of literature

BACKGROUND: Patients with anaphylaxis can have acute coronary syndromes secondary to allergic mediator effects on coronary vessels. Information about these cases is restricted to isolated case reports.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2009

Therapeutic effects of hyaluronic acid on osteoarthritis of the knee: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

Bibliographic details: Wang C T, Lin J, Chang C J, Lin Y T, Hou S M.  Therapeutic effects of hyaluronic acid on osteoarthritis of the knee: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery 2004; 86A(3): 538-545

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2004

Efficacy of sublingual allergen vaccination for respiratory allergy in children: conclusions from one meta-analysis

This review assessed sublingual allergen vaccination in comparison with placebo in children with respiratory allergy. Given the observed reductions in symptoms and medication requirements, the authors concluded that this intervention provides a safe and effective alternative to subcutaneous vaccination. The limited evidence presented suggests that the conclusions are overestimated at this stage, but recommendations for future research are justified.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2005

Allergy Shots and Allergy Drops for Adults and Children: A Review of the Research

This summary will cover: What allergies are How allergies are treated What researchers found about how well allergy shots and allergy drops work Possible side effects of allergy shots and allergy drops This summary can help you talk with your doctor about whether allergy shots or allergy drops might be right for you or your child.

Comparative Effectiveness Review Summary Guides for Consumers [Internet] - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: August 22, 2013

This review examines strategies to enable the continued use of the antibiotic cotrimoxazole in patients with HIV/AIDS to treat or prevent opportunistic infections in patients who previously experienced hypersensitivity to this drug.

Opportunistic infections are a threat to the lives and health of people living with HIV. Cotrimoxazole, an antibiotic also known as trimethoprim‐sulfamethoxazole, is used in the treatment and prevention of several opportunistic infections. In patients with HIV/AIDS, cotrimoxazole can cause more drug‐related side effects than in the general population. However, there are not many effective alternatives for this drug, which is also by far the cheapest option available. When a patient with HIV experiences a side effect related to cotrimoxazole, often the drug is continued (treating‐through) or reintroduced at a later date, either using increasingly larger doses (desensitization), or immediately starting at the full dose (rechallenge). This systematic review is the first to examine the differences in how patients are able to tolerate these strategies.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2009

Drug Class Review: Newer Drugs for Insomnia: Final Report Update 2 [Internet]

Insomnia is a serious health problem that affects millions of people. Population surveys have estimated the prevalence of insomnia to be about 30% to 50% of the general population. About three-fourths of people who have trouble sleeping say that the problem is "occasional," averaging about 6 nights per month, with one-fourth having frequent or chronic insomnia, averaging about 16 nights per month. Individuals with insomnia most often report a combination of difficulty falling asleep and intermittent wakefulness during sleep. Treatment of insomnia involves behavioral changes, such as minimizing habits that interfere with sleep (for example, drinking coffee or engaging in stressful activities in the evening), and pharmacotherapy with sedating antidepressants (for example, trazodone), sedating antihistamines, anticholinergics, benzodiazepines, or nonbenzodiazepine hypnotics. The benzodiazepines and the newer sedative hypnotics zolpidem, zaleplon, zopiclone, and eszopiclone work through gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors. Ramelteon, a hypnotic approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in July 2005, is a selective melatonin receptor (MT1 and MT2) agonist. New nonbenzodiazepine drugs have been sought for multiple reasons, including reduction of the risk of tolerance, dependence, and abuse associated with benzodiazepines. The purpose of this review is to evaluate the comparative evidence on benefits and harms of these medications in people with insomnia to help policymakers and clinicians make informed choices about the use of newer drugs for insomnia.

Drug Class Reviews - Oregon Health & Science University.

Version: October 2008
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Drug Class Review: Nasal Corticosteroids: Final Report Update 1 [Internet]

Nasal corticosteroids are a safe and effective treatment option for both allergic and non-allergic rhinitis. There are currently 8 different nasal corticosteroid preparations on the U.S. market. The nasal sprays differ with respect to delivery device and propellant, as well as potency and dosing frequency. The purpose of this review is evaluating the comparative evidence on the benefits and harms of the nasal corticosteroids to help policy makers and clinicians make informed choices.

Drug Class Reviews - Oregon Health & Science University.

Version: June 2008
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Hypersensitivity associated with sugammadex administration: a systematic review

Sugammadex is a drug used to reverse neuromuscular blockade induced by rocuronium or vecuronium. It has not yet been approved by the Food and Drug Administration in the USA due to concerns regarding hypersensitivity. The objective of this review was to identify similarities in the presentation of hypersensitivity reactions to sugammadex. A comprehensive search was performed in PubMed, Scopus and Web of Science for cases reporting hypersensitivity reactions to sugammadex. In addition, we contacted regulatory agencies and the company marketing the drug for unpublished reports. Reports were included if they were in English, primary investigations, lacked an alternative probable explanation for the reaction and included a comprehensive description of the hypersensitivity. We identified 15 cases of hypersensitivity following sugammadex administration. All cases that reported exact timing (14/15) occurred in 4 min or less. Most of the patients (11/15; 73%) met World Anaphylaxis Organization criteria for anaphylaxis. Awareness must be raised for the possibility of drug-induced hypersensitivity during the critical 5-min period immediately following sugammadex administration.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2014

Incidence of immediate hypersensitivity reaction and serum sickness following administration of crotalidae polyvalent immune Fab antivenom: a meta-analysis

OBJECTIVES:   Crotalidae polyvalent immune Fab (ovine) (FabAV) is commonly used in the treatment of symptomatic North American crotaline snake envenomation. When approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in 2000, the incidences of immediate hypersensitivity reactions and serum sickness were reported as 0.14 and 0.18, respectively. The objective of this meta-analysis was to evaluate the incidence of immediate hypersensitivity reactions and serum sickness reported in studies of patients treated with FabAV therapy after North American crotaline envenomation.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2012

Food Allergy in Children and Young People: Diagnosis and Assessment of Food Allergy in Children and Young People in Primary Care and Community Settings

Food allergy is an adverse immune response to a food. It can be classified into IgE-mediated and non-IgE-mediated reactions. Many non-IgE reactions, which are poorly defined both clinically and scientifically, are believed to be T-cell-mediated. Some reactions involve a mixture of both IgE and non-IgE responses and are classified as mixed IgE and non-IgE allergic reactions. Food allergy may be confused with food intolerance, which is a non-immunological reaction that can be caused by enzyme deficiencies, pharmacological agents and naturally occurring substances. Food intolerance will not be covered in this guideline. The starting point for the guideline is a suspicion of food allergy, and the use of an allergy-focused clinical history will help to determine whether a food allergy is likely.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (UK).

Version: February 2011
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A Systematic Review of the Clinical Effectiveness and Cost-Effectiveness of Pharmalgen® for the Treatment of Bee and Wasp Venom Allergy

Each year in the UK, there are between two and nine deaths from anaphylaxis caused by bee and wasp venom. Anaphylactic reactions can occur rapidly following a sting and can progress to a life-threatening condition within minutes. To avoid further reactions in people with a history of anaphylaxis to bee and wasp venom, the use of desensitisation, through a process known as venom immunotherapy (VIT), has been investigated and is in use in the UK. VIT consists of subcutaneous injections of increasing amounts of purified bee and/or wasp venom extract. Pharmalgen® products (ALK Abelló) have had UK marketing authorisation for VIT (as well as diagnosis) of allergy to bee venom (using Pharmalgen Bee Venom) and wasp venom (using Pharmalgen Wasp Venom) since March 1995.

Health Technology Assessment - NIHR Evaluation, Trials and Studies Coordinating Centre (UK).

Version: March 2012
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Fact sheet: Asthma in pregnancy

Many women who have asthma find that it actually improves in early pregnancy, or at least stays the same. But for about 1 in 3 women, the changes of pregnancy will make their asthma worse. Towards the end of pregnancy it often becomes increasingly difficult to stay physically active. Carrying the extra weight around can even make women who do not have asthma get out of breath. Many are unable to sleep properly, feel tired and exhausted. This does not make pregnancy any easier.

Informed Health Online [Internet] - Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG).

Version: October 31, 2012

The Management of Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms in Men [Internet]

The guideline covers men (18 and over) with a clinical working diagnosis of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). Options for conservative, pharmacological, surgical, and complementary or alternative treatments are considered in terms of clinical and cost effectiveness.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Clinical Guideline Centre (UK).

Version: 2010
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Drug Class Review: Newer Antiemetics: Final Report Update 1 [Internet]

Nausea and vomiting are major concerns for patients undergoing chemotherapy, radiation therapy and surgery with general anesthesia. Risk factors associated with chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting include emetogenicity of the chemotherapy regimen, dose, speed of intravenous infusion, female gender, age under 50 years, history of ethanol consumption, and history of prior chemotherapy. Factors predictive of radiation therapy-induced nausea and vomiting include site of irradiation (in particular, total body irradiation and radiation fields that include the abdomen), total field size, dose per fraction, age, and predisposition for emesis (history of sickness during pregnancy or motion sickness). Female gender, a history of motion sickness or prior postoperative nausea and vomiting, nonsmoking status, and use of postoperative opioids have been suggested as factors predictive of postoperative nausea and vomiting. The objective of this review was to evaluate the comparative effectiveness and harms of newer antiemetic drugs including the 5-HT3 and NK-1 antagonists.

Drug Class Reviews - Oregon Health & Science University.

Version: January 2009
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Drug Class Review: Controller Medications for Asthma: Final Update 1 Report [Internet]

To compare the efficacy and safety of inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs), long-acting beta-2 agonists (LABAs), leukotriene modifiers (LMs), anti-IgE therapy, combination products, and tiotropium for people with persistent asthma.

Drug Class Reviews - Oregon Health & Science University.

Version: April 2011
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Drug Class Review: Beta Adrenergic Blockers: Final Report Update 4 [Internet]

Beta blockers inhibit the chronotropic, inotropic, and vasoconstrictor responses to the catecholamines, epinephrine, and norepinephrine. Beta blockers differ in their duration of effect (3 hours to 22 hours), the types of beta receptors they block (β1-selective or β1/β2-nonselective), whether they are simultaneously capable of exerting low level heart rate increases (intrinsic sympathomimetic activity [ISA]), and in whether they provide additional blood vessel dilation effects by also blocking alpha-1 receptors. All beta blockers are approved for the treatment of hypertension. Other US Food and Drug Administration-approved uses are specific to each beta blocker and include stable and unstable angina, atrial arrhythmias, bleeding esophageal varices, coronary artery disease, asymptomatic and symptomatic heart failure, migraine, and secondary prevention of post-myocardial infarction. The objective of this review was to evaluate the comparative effectiveness and harms of beta blockers in adult patients with hypertension, angina, coronary artery bypass graft, recent myocardial infarction, heart failure, atrial arrhythmia, migraine or bleeding esophageal varices.

Drug Class Reviews - Oregon Health & Science University.

Version: July 2009
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Drug Class Review: Disease-modifying Drugs for Multiple Sclerosis: Final Update 1 Report [Internet]

We compared the effectiveness and safety of disease-modifying drugs for the treatment of multiple sclerosis: Glatiramer acetate (Copaxone®), interferon beta-1a (Avonex®, Rebif®), interferon beta-1b (Betaseron®, Extavia®), mitoxantrone (Novantrone®), and natalizumab (Tysabri®).

Drug Class Reviews - Oregon Health & Science University.

Version: August 2010
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Depression in Children and Young People: Identification and Management in Primary, Community and Secondary Care

This guideline has been developed to advise on the identification and management of depression in children and young people in primary, community and secondary care. The guideline recommendations have been developed by a multidisciplinary team of healthcare professionals, carers, and guideline methodologists after careful consideration of the best available evidence. It is intended that the guidelines will be useful to clinicians and service commissioners in providing and planning high-quality care for children and young people with depression while also emphasising the importance of the experience of care for patients and their families.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Mental Health (UK).

Version: 2005
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Drug Class Review: HMG-CoA Reductase Inhibitors (Statins) and Fixed-dose Combination Products Containing a Statin: Final Report Update 5 [Internet]

In the United States, coronary heart disease and cardiovascular disease account for nearly 40% of all deaths each year. Coronary heart disease continues to be the leading cause of mortality and a significant cause of morbidity among North Americans. In 2006, coronary heart disease claimed 607 000 lives, translating into about 1 out of every 5 deaths in the United States. High levels of cholesterol, or hypercholesterolemia, are an important risk factor for coronary heart disease. The 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors, also known as statins, are the most effective class of drugs for lowering serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations. They are first-line agents for patients who require drug therapy to reduce serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations. The purpose of this review is to compare the benefits and harms of different statins in adults and children with hypercholesterolemia.

Drug Class Reviews - Oregon Health & Science University.

Version: November 2009
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Drug Class Review: Long-Acting Opioid Analgesics: Final Update 6 Report [Internet]

We compared the effectiveness and harms of long-acting opioids and of long-acting opioids compared with short-acting opioids in adults with chronic noncancer pain.

Drug Class Reviews - Oregon Health & Science University.

Version: July 2011
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Medical Encyclopedia

  • Drug allergies
    Drug allergies are a group of symptoms caused by an allergic reaction to a drug (medication).
  • Drug Class Review: Newer Antihistamines: Final Report Update 2 [Internet]
    Antihistamines inhibit the effects of histamine at H1 receptors. They have a number of clinical indications including allergic conditions (e.g., rhinitis, dermatoses, atopic dermatitis, contact dermatitis, allergic conjunctivitis, hypersensitivity reactions to drugs, mild transfusion reactions, and urticaria), chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU), motion sickness, vertigo, and insomnia.
  • Allergy testing - skin
    Allergy skin tests are tests used to find out which substances cause a person to have an allergic reaction.
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Systematic Reviews in PubMed

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