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Results: 7

Histamine‐blocking drugs for hives

Urticaria is a common skin disease characterised by itching weals or hives that can appear anywhere on the surface of the skin. Weals may be pinpoint in size or several inches in diameter. Most sufferers experience hives continuously or intermittently for less than six weeks, but they may last longer (when they are then called 'chronic'). Urticaria can also be accompanied by angioedema (swelling of a deeper layer of the skin). There are several varieties of urticaria, but the most common forms are acute urticaria and chronic urticaria. Common causes of acute urticaria are infections and adverse reactions to medications and foods, whereas in chronic urticaria the cause is often unknown. Intense itching is common, and it can lead to disturbed sleep and even depression, having a serious impact on a person's quality of life. As the face and other exposed body parts can be affected, hives and angioedema can prove embarrassing for the individual.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2012

Honey for acute cough in children

We wanted to know if honey can reduce cough symptoms caused by bacteria and viruses in children.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2015

Interventions for people with schizophrenia who have too much saliva due to clozapine treatment

Clozapine is an antipsychotic medication used in the treatment of schizophrenia, a mental health problem that can cause symptoms such as hallucinations and delusions and social withdrawal. Clozapine may be useful in those for whom other medications have not worked very well. One of the common side‐effects of clozapine is having too much saliva in the mouth (hypersalivation). This can be embarrassing in public and problematic, especially at night. This review is about ways of reducing this problem and includes 15 trials containing 964 people, most of which were done in hospitals in China. Treatments included medications that had previously been useful for this problem or were thought to work in theory. The medications used were from a group of drugs called antimuscarinics, traditional Chinese medicines or others. The trials were short (all four weeks or less). From these trials the antimuscarinics; astemizole, diphenhydramine and propantheline, were shown to be better than placebo at reducing hypersalivation. Another medication called oryzanol and a Chinese traditional medicine called Suo quo wan were found to have benefit over doxepin, an antimuscarinic. However, because of the shortness of the trials, poor reporting and the limitations of design, it is difficult to draw any firm conclusions from these results. 

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2012

Pre‐transfusion drugs for preventing side effects from blood transfusions

Febrile non‐haemolytic transfusion reactions (FNHTRs) and allergic reactions are the most common adverse reactions to blood transfusion. These reactions are often related to other dangerous side effects from transfusion such as sepsis due to contaminated blood products and intravascular red cell haemolysis.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2010

Comparing New Antihistamines

How do newer antihistamines compare in treating allergic rhinitis?

PubMed Clinical Q&A [Internet] - National Center for Biotechnology Information (US).

Version: February 10, 2011

Treatment of the cough in whooping cough

We reviewed the evidence from 12 studies about the effect of treatments for cough in patients with whooping cough.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2014

Topiramate for treating neuropathic pain or fibromyalgia

Neuropathic pain is pain coming from damaged nerves. It is different from pain messages carried along healthy nerves from damaged tissue (for example from a fall, a cut, or arthritic knee). Neuropathic pain is treated by different medicines than pain from damaged tissue. Medicines like paracetamol or ibuprofen are not effective in treating neuropathic pain, while medicines that are sometimes used to treat depression or epilepsy can be very effective in some people with neuropathic pain. Our knowledge about fibromyalgia is even less advanced, but fibromyalgia can respond to the same medicines as neuropathic pain.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2013

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