Home > Search Results
  • Added to PubMed Health

    clear
    • Custom range...

Results: 6

Antibiotics for ureaplasma in the vagina in pregnancy

Ureaplasmas are normal flora in the vagina of many women. In some women high levels of ureaplasma in the vagina, which probably reflect the presence of infection in the uterus, may have a role in pregnancy complications, or may contribute to babies being born before full term (preterm birth), or both. These babies can have serious health problems. Some antibiotics can be safely used during pregnancy and are also active against ureaplasma. The authors identified only one trial (involving 1071 women) that was eligible for inclusion in this review. Therefore, there is insufficient data to assess whether giving antibiotics to women with ureaplasma in the vagina reduces the risk of preterm birth.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2011

Antibiotics for treating bacterial vaginosis in pregnancy

Bacteria are normally present in the birth canal and are useful in maintaining the health of the vagina. However, if the numbers of some of the bacteria increase, this is called bacterial vaginosis. For some women, there are no symptoms but for others it may cause an unpleasant discharge and may cause some babies to be born too early. These babies can suffer from problems related to their immaturity both in the weeks following birth such as breathing difficulty, infection and bleeding within the brain as well as problems when growing up such as poor growth, chronic lung disease and delayed development.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2012

Antibiotic regimens for postpartum endometritis

Intravenous clindamycin plus gentamicin is more effective than other antibiotics or combinations of antibiotics for treatment of womb infection after childbirth.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2015

The effects of antimicrobial treatment on bacterial vaginosis in non‐pregnant women  

Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a very common cause of symptomatic and asymptomatic vaginal infection. It has been associated with a high incidence of obstetric and gynaecologic complications and an increased risk of transmission of HIV (human immunodeficiency virus). This review evaluated the effectiveness and adverse effects of antimicrobial agents used to treat BV in non‐pregnant women. Twenty‐four trials involving 4422 women were reviewed. With regard to less treatment failure, clindamycin was superior to placebo but comparable to metronidazole, irrespective of the dose regimen. Metronidazole tended to cause a higher rate of adverse events, such as metallic taste and nausea and vomiting, than did clindamycin. Oral lactobacillus combined with metronidazole was more effective than metronidazole alone. Administered in an intravaginal gelatin tablet, lactobacillus was also more effective than oral metronidazole. Triple sulfonamide cream was less effective compared with clindamycin. Hydrogen peroxide douche was not as effective as a single 2 g dose of metronidazole yet caused more harms. Only one trial involved asymptomatic women and the result was not conclusive. There was insufficient evidence to reach a conclusion on the effectiveness of other promising drugs. Drugs effective for bacterial vaginosis include clindamycin preparations, oral metronidazole, and oral and intravaginal tablets of lactobacillus. Adverse effects of metronidazole include metallic taste, and nausea and vomiting. Information on possible side effects of lactobacillus preparations is required.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2009

Antibiotic regimens for management of intraamniotic infection

Antibiotics are used to prevent life‐threatening complications for mother and baby when the amniotic fluid is infected, but it is not known which antibiotic is best.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2015

Using antibiotics to treat intra‐amniotic infection in pregnant women

Review question: Cochrane authors reviewed available evidence from randomized controlled trials on the use of antibiotics for the treatment of pregnant women with intra‐amniotic infection (chorioamnionitis).

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2015

Recent Activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...