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Results: 18

Cervical cancer and use of hormonal contraceptives: a systematic review

This review concluded that longer durations of hormonal contraceptive use are associated with an increased risk of developing invasive or in situ cervical cancer. However, despite concerns about the review methodology and the variability of the studies, the authors' cautious conclusions seem reasonable given the data presented.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2003

Long-term risk of invasive cervical cancer after treatment of squamous cervical intraepithelial neoplasia

This review determined the occurrence of invasive cancer after treatment for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and the rate of post-treatment CIN. The authors found a persistently high long-term risk of invasive cervical cancer after treatment for CIN, whereas the rate of post-treatment CIN showed a steady decrease over time. The review has some methodological weaknesses but the authors' cautious conclusions appear reliable.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2006

Effectiveness of cervical cerclage for a sonographically shortened cervix: a systematic review and meta-analysis

This review assessed the effectiveness of cervical cerclage for a sonographically shortened cervix. The authors concluded that there is insufficient evidence to support the use of cervical cerclage. The authors' conclusions are appropriate based on the evidence presented.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2003

Elective cervical cerclage for prevention of preterm birth: a systematic review

This review assessed elective cervical cerclage for the prevention of pre-term birth. The authors concluded that the intervention was effective in preventing spontaneous pre-term birth before 34 weeks' gestation in comparison with standard treatment without cerclage. Overall, the authors' conclusion is consistent with the evidence reviewed and would appear to be robust.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2003

Radiochemotherapy versus radiotherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer: a meta-analysis

This review found that the combination of radiotherapy with chemotherapy was associated with significant benefits in response rate and survival in women with locally advanced cervical cancer. The lack of clarity about the treatment regimens and lack of information on follow-up mean that the reliability of the authors' conclusions is unclear.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2011

Adjuvant phytotherapy in the treatment of cervical cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis

This review compared conventional therapies versus adjuvant phytotherapy in treating patients with cervical cancer. The authors concluded that adjuvant phytotherapy may increase survival and tumour regression rates and decrease vesical complications, but that the results require verification. This cautious conclusion appears to reliably reflect limited evidence from the generally poor quality available trials.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2009

Ultrasound-predicated versus history-predicated cerclage in women at risk of cervical insufficiency: a systematic review

The authors concluded that comparable pregnancy outcomes were achievable following ultrasound- versus history-predicated cerclage in at-risk women; there was limited evidence on cerclage complications. Ultrasound reduced the number of required cerclages. This was a generally well-conducted review, but the authors conclusion was based on a small number of mixed-method study designs and should be treated with caution.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2008

Brachytherapy for cervix cancer: low-dose rate or high-dose rate brachytherapy; a meta-analysis of clinical trials

This review concluded that there were no differences between high-dose rate and low-dose rate brachytherapy for overall survival, local recurrence and late complications for clinical stages I, II and III of cervical cancer. A degree of caution might be required in interpreting these conclusions, given the limited quality of included RCTs and methodological concerns in the review methods.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2009

Follow-up for women after treatment for cervical cancer: a systematic review

The authors concluded that there was modest low-quality evidence to inform the most appropriate follow-up strategy for patients with cervical cancer who were clinically disease free after primary treatment. Limitations in the review, including poorly defined inclusion criteria, possibility of language and publication bias, and lack of comparative data mean that the conclusions should be interpreted with extreme caution.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2009

Primary Care Management of Abnormal Uterine Bleeding [Internet]

The Vanderbilt Evidence-based practice Center systematically reviewed evidence about interventions for symptomatic abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB), both irregular and cyclic. We focused on interventions that are suitable for use in primary care practice including medical, behavioral, and complementary and alternative medicine approaches.

Comparative Effectiveness Reviews - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: March 2013
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Heavy Menstrual Bleeding

Heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB) has an adverse effect on the quality of life of many women. It is not a problem associated with significant mortality. Many women seek help from their general practitioners and it is a common reason for referral into secondary care.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Women's and Children's Health (UK).

Version: January 2007
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Long-acting Reversible Contraception: The Effective and Appropriate Use of Long-Acting Reversible Contraception

Contraception can be divided into two broad categories: hormonal and nonhormonal. There are two categories of hormonal contraception: combined oestrogen and progestogen and progestogen-only. Long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) is defined in this guideline as methods that require administering less than once per cycle or month.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Women’s and Children’s Health (UK).

Version: October 2005
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Antenatal Care: Routine Care for the Healthy Pregnant Woman

The original antenatal care guideline was published by NICE in 2003. Since then a number of important pieces of evidence have become available, particularly concerning gestational diabetes, haemoglobinopathy and ultrasound, so that the update was initiated. This update has also provided an opportunity to look at a number of aspects of antenatal care: the development of a method to assess women for whom additional care is necessary (the ‘antenatal assessment tool’), information giving to women, lifestyle (vitamin D supplementation, alcohol consumption), screening for the baby (use of ultrasound for gestational age assessment and screening for fetal abnormalities, methods for determining normal fetal growth, placenta praevia), and screening for the mother (haemoglobinopathy screening, gestational diabetes, pre-eclampsia and preterm labour, chlamydia).

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Women's and Children's Health (UK).

Version: March 2008
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Microwave therapy for cervical ectropion

In western countries, cervical ectropion or erosion caused by the movement of columnar epithelium onto the vaginal portion of the cervix is considered a normal physiological process not requiring intervention. In China, however, cervical ectropion is considered as one of the most common types of chronic cervicitis and is often treated. One of the topical treatments widely used is microwave tissue coagulation (MTC). From Chinese databases, the authors identified 131 potential randomised controlled clinical trials (RCTs) that compared microwave therapy to no treatment or other treatments. Only three of these studies involving a total of 540 participants were identified as RCTs. Two studies (420 participants) compared MTC versus laser, and one study (120 participants) compared MTC with an interferon‐alpha suppository. The follow‐up period of the RCTs was adequate. None of the studies assessed relief of symptoms or quality of life and satisfaction, which are very important to women. The authors of the review considered that they could not answer the review question about the appropriate use of microwave therapy as only these three low quality RCTs were found. Although the trials showed improved appearance of the cervix with microwave treatment compared with the control therapy, it was not possible to ascertain whether the women were symptomatic before treatment. The review protocol also required participants to be symptomatic with mucopurulent discharge or to have contact bleeding before treatment. At present, intervention for inflammatory cervical ectropion is still controversial.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2010

Strategies for partner notification for sexually transmitted infections, including HIV.

Sexually transmitted infections (STI) are a major global cause of acute illness, infertility and death. Every year there are an estimated 499 million new cases of the most common curable STIs (trichomoniasis, chlamydia, syphilis and gonorrhoea), and between two and three million new cases of HIV. The presence of several STIs, including syphilis and herpes can increase the risk of acquiring or transmitting HIV.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2013

Screening for Chlamydial Infection: A Focused Evidence Update for the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force [Internet]

In preparing this review, the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) began by considering what type of evidence would be necessary to require revision of the 2001 systematic review of the evidence on screening for chlamydial infection. For example, since the USPSTF in 2001 found insufficient evidence to conclude that screening men could lead to a decreased incidence of infection in women, new evidence concerning this question might lead to a revision of the USPSTF recommendation for screening men. Additionally, changes in the epidemiology of chlamydial infection might lead to a revision of the categorization of increased risk.

Evidence Syntheses - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: June 2007
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Systematic review of the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of rapid point-of-care tests for the detection of genital chlamydia infection in women and men

Chlamydia is the most common sexually-transmitted infection in the world. Left untreated, chlamydia can cause epididymitis and urethritis in men, and cervicitis and urethritis in women, as well as potentially creating future fertility problems for women (e.g. ectopic pregnancy, pelvic inflammatory disease and tubal infertility). Yet, 50% of infected men and 70% of infected women do not experience symptoms of the infection.

NIHR Health Technology Assessment programme: Executive Summaries - NIHR Evaluation, Trials and Studies Coordinating Centre (UK).

Version: 2010

Behavioral Counseling to Prevent Sexually Transmitted Infections [Internet]

Despite advances in prevention and treatment, sexually transmitted infections (STIs) remain a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. There are an estimated 19 million new infections each year in the US costing about $13 billion.

Evidence Syntheses - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: October 2008
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Medical Encyclopedia

  • Cervicitis
    Cervicitis is swelling (inflammation) of the end of the uterus (cervix).
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Systematic Reviews in PubMed

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