Home > Search Results
  • We are sorry, but NCBI web applications do not support your browser and may not function properly. More information

Treats ulcers and other stomach problems.

UsesSide effectsLatest evidence reviewsResearch summaries for consumersBrand names

Results: 19

Effect of histamine-2-receptor antagonists versus sucralfate on stress ulcer prophylaxis in mechanically ventilated patients: a meta-analysis of 10 randomized controlled trials

Bibliographic details: Huang J, Cao Y, Liao C, Wu L, Gao F.  Effect of histamine-2-receptor antagonists versus sucralfate on stress ulcer prophylaxis in mechanically ventilated patients: a meta-analysis of 10 randomized controlled trials. Critical Care 2010; 14(5): R194 Available from: http://ccforum.com/content/14/5/R194/abstract/

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2010

Dyspepsia: Managing Dyspepsia in Adults in Primary Care

This national guideline provides evidence-based recommendations for the primary care management of dyspepsia symptoms and underlying causes in adults. It was developed for use by the National Health Service in England and Wales. NHS healthcare professionals, patient representatives and researchers developed this guideline, incorporating comments received from referees and from an extensive national stakeholder consultation.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - North of England Dyspepsia Guideline Development Group (UK).

Version: August 1, 2004
Show search results within this document

Lactose Intolerance and Health

We systematically reviewed evidence to determine lactose intolerance (LI) prevalence, bone health after dairy-exclusion diets, tolerable dose of lactose in subjects with diagnosed LI, and management.

Evidence Reports/Technology Assessments - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: February 2010
Show search results within this document

Drug Class Review: Proton Pump Inhibitors: Final Report Update 5 [Internet]

Proton pump inhibitors decrease secretion of gastric acid. They act by blocking the last enzyme in the system that actively transports acid from gastric parietal cells into the gastrointestinal lumen, hydrogen–potassium adenosine triphosphatase, also known as the proton pump. Omeprazole, the first drug in this class, was introduced in 1989. Since then, 4 other proton pump inhibitors have been introduced: lansoprazole (1995), rabeprazole (1999), pantoprazole (2000), and esomeprazole (2001). In 2003 omeprazole became available over-the-counter in the United States. The purpose of this review is to compare the benefits and harms of different PPIs.

Drug Class Reviews - Oregon Health & Science University.

Version: May 2009
Show search results within this document

[Relationship between antacid therapy and hospital acquired pneumonia in critically ill patients: a meta-analysis].

OBJECTIVE: To systematically review the effect of antacid medication on stress-related mucosal disease (SRMD) bleeding, hospital acquired pneumonia (HAP), and hospital mortality in critically ill patients admitted to intensive care unit (ICU).

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2013

Prevention of oral mucositis in children receiving cancer therapy: a systematic review and evidence-based analysis

This systematic review investigated, critically appraised, and rated the evidence on agents used to prevent oral mucositis in children. A comprehensive search of the relevant literature was performed up to December 2011. Articles were included according to the inclusion/exclusion criteria and were critically appraised for validation and quality assessment using a checklist consisting of 18 categories. Each article was then rated for its strength of evidence. 16,471 articles were retrieved from 19 different databases and then reduced to 27 articles that fit the inclusion criteria. Five articles on oral care protocols supported their use to prevent oral mucositis in children. Seven articles on chlorhexidine mouthwash and three on laser therapy had conflicting evidence of its use. The preventative agents that were supported by one or two articles included: benzydamine mouthwash, iseganan mouthwash, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) mouthwash, oral/enteral glutamine, oral propantheline and cryotherapy, oral cryotherapy, oral sucralfate suspension, prostaglandin E2 tablets, and chewing gum. The reduction in the rates of occurrence of oral mucositis when using agents of fair (B) to good (A) evidence ranged from 22% to 52%. In conclusion, this review suggests the use of oral care protocols to prevent oral mucositis in children because of their strength of evidence (fair to good). The authors suggest avoiding agents with fair to good evidence against their use (oral sucralfate suspension, prostaglandin E2 tablets, and GM-CSF mouthwash). Agents with conflicting evidence (chlorhexidine mouthwash (used solely), laser therapy, and glutamine) should also be avoided until further research confirms their efficacy.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2013

Endoscopic and medical therapy for chronic radiation proctopathy: a systematic review

BACKGROUND: Chronic radiation proctopathy is associated with significant morbidity. The effectiveness of endoscopic and medical therapies has not been evaluated.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2012

Chronic radiation proctitis (rectal inflammation) affects a small but notable proportion of patients who undergo pelvic radiotherapy

The aim of this review was to identify the interventions used in the treatment of late radiation proctitis and evaluate the evidence. We have demonstrated that although there are a number of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in this field, they address quite diverse interventions. Although these studies can be assessed individually, this data cannot be used to compare the efficacy of different treatments.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2009

Interventions for preventing oral mucositis for patients with cancer receiving treatment

Treatment for cancer (including bone marrow transplant) can cause oral mucositis (severe ulcers in the mouth). This painful condition can cause difficulties in eating, drinking and swallowing, and may also be associated with infections which may require the patient to stay longer in hospital. Different strategies are used to try and prevent this condition, and the review of trials found that some of these are effective. Two interventions, cryotherapy (ice chips) and keratinocyte growth factor (palifermin®) showed some benefit in preventing mucositis. Sucralfate is effective in reducing the severity of mucositis, and a further seven interventions, aloe vera, amifostine, intravenous glutamine, granulocyte‐colony stimulating factor (G‐CSF), honey, laser and antibiotic lozenges containing polymixin/tobramycin/amphotericin (PTA) showed weaker evidence of benefit. These were evaluated in patients with different types of cancer, undergoing different types of cancer treatment. Benefits may be restricted to the disease and treatment combinations evaluated.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2013

Management of skin toxicity during radiation therapy: a review of the evidence

Acute skin toxicity occurs in the majority of the patients undergoing radical radiotherapy. While a variety of topical agents and dressing are used to ameliorate side effects, there is minimal evidence to support their use. The aims of this study were to systematically review evidence on acute skin toxicity management and to assess the current practices in ANZ. A systematic review of the literature was conducted on studies published between 1980 and 2008. A meta-analysis was performed on articles on clinical trials reporting grade II or greater toxicity. Analyses were divided into breast (the most common site) and other sites. A survey of Radiation Oncology departments across ANZ was conducted to identify patterns of practices and compare these with the published evidence. Twenty-nine articles were reviewed. Only seven articles demonstrated statistically significant results for management of side-effects. These were for topical corticosteroids, hyaluronic acid, sucralfate, calendula, Cavilon cream (3M, St Paul, Minnesota, USA) and silver leaf dressing. Meta-analysis demonstrated statistical significance for the prophylactic use of topical agents in the management acute toxicity. The survey of departments had a low response rate but demonstrated variation in skin care practices across ANZ. A considerable number of these practices were based only on anecdotal evidence. Lack of evidence in the literature for the care of radiation skin reactions was associated with variation in practice. Only a limited number of studies have demonstrated a significant benefit of specific topical agents. There is a need for objective and prospective recording of skin toxicity to collect meaningful comparative data on which to base recommendations for practice.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2010

Preventive intervention possibilities in radiotherapy- and chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis: results of meta-analyses

This review assessed the efficacy of interventions for the prevention of head and neck radiotherapy- and/or chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis. The authors concluded that no individual intervention is capable of preventing oral mucositis completely. Given a number of issues with the review methodology and reporting, it is not possible to determine the reliability of this conclusion.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2006

Stress ulcer, gastritis, and gastrointestinal bleeding prophylaxis in critically ill pediatric patients: a systematic review

OBJECTIVE: To identify and evaluate the quality of evidence supporting prophylactic use of treatments for stress ulcers and upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Stress ulcers, erosions of the stomach and duodenum, and upper gastrointestinal bleeding are well-known complications of critical illness in children admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2010

Interventions for treating oral mucositis for patients with cancer receiving treatment

Using a low level laser may reduce the severity of ulcers caused by cancer treatment.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2010

Prostate Cancer: Diagnosis and Treatment

Prostate cancer is one of the commonest cancers in men. Each year there are about 27,773 new cases in England and Wales, and 9161 deaths. Prostate cancer is predominantly a disease of older men but around 20% of cases occur in men under the age of 65. Over the past 10 to 15 years there have been a number of significant advances in its management but also a number of major controversies, especially about the clinical management of patients with early, non-metastatic disease. These uncertainties clearly cause anxieties for patients and their families. There is evidence of practice variation around the country and of patchy availability of certain treatments and procedures. A clinical guideline will help to address these issues and offer guidance on best practice.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Cancer (UK).

Version: February 2008
Show search results within this document

Making Health Care Safer II: An Updated Critical Analysis of the Evidence for Patient Safety Practices

To review important patient safety practices for evidence of effectiveness, implementation, and adoption.

Evidence Reports/Technology Assessments - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: March 2013
Show search results within this document

Comparative Effectiveness of Management Strategies for Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease: Update [Internet]

Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is one of the most common health conditions affecting Americans. Despite the availability of medical, surgical, and endoscopic options, optimal management strategies remain unsettled.

Comparative Effectiveness Reviews - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: September 2011
Show search results within this document

Osteoarthritis: National Clinical Guideline for Care and Management in Adults

This guideline applies to people with a working diagnosis of osteoarthritis who present for treatment or whose activities of daily living are significantly affected by their osteoarthritis. The management of neck or back pain related to degenerative changes in spine are not part of this guideline.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Chronic Conditions (UK).

Version: 2008
Show search results within this document

Oral Complications of Chemotherapy and Head/Neck Radiation (PDQ®): Health Professional Version

Expert-reviewed information summary about oral complications, such as mucositis and salivary gland dysfunction, that occur in cancer patients treated with chemotherapy or radiation therapy to the head and neck.

PDQ Cancer Information Summaries [Internet] - National Cancer Institute (US).

Version: April 23, 2014

Alcohol Use Disorders: Diagnosis and Clinical Management of Alcohol-Related Physical Complications [Internet]

Alcohol is the most widely used psychotropic drug in the industrialised world; it has been used for thousands of years as a social lubricant and anxiolytic. In the UK, it is estimated that 24% of adult men and 13% of adult women drink in a hazardous or harmful way. Levels of hazardous and harmful drinking are lowest in the central and eastern regions of England (21–24% of men and 10–14% of women). They are highest in the north (26–28% of men, 16–18% of women). Hazardous and harmful drinking are commonly encountered amongst hospital attendees; 12% of emergency department attendances are directly related to alcohol whilst 20% of patients admitted to hospital for illnesses unrelated to alcohol are drinking at potentially hazardous levels. Continued hazardous and harmful drinking can result in dependence and tolerance with the consequence that an abrupt reduction in intake might result in development of a withdrawal syndrome. In addition, persistent drinking at hazardous and harmful levels can also result in damage to almost every organ or system of the body. Alcohol-attributable conditions include liver damage, pancreatitis and the Wernicke’s encephalopathy. Key areas in the investigation and management of these conditions are covered in this guideline.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Clinical Guideline Centre (UK).

Version: 2010
Show search results within this document

Systematic Reviews in PubMed

See all (82)...

Recent Activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...