Home > Search Results
  • We are sorry, but NCBI web applications do not support your browser and may not function properly. More information

Results: 1 to 20 of 417

Signs of a stroke

A stroke is an emergency. If you think someone might be having a stroke, it is very important to call the emergency services (in Germany: 112, in the United States: 911) immediately and ask for medical help. Reacting quickly and getting treatment as soon as possible can sometimes stop brain cells from dying. That lowers the risk of serious consequences.

Informed Health Online [Internet] - Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG).

Version: March 25, 2011

After a stroke: How helpful is occupational therapy for people having problems with everyday activities like getting dressed?

Occupational therapy can help people who have had a stroke be more independent. Everyday activities like getting up and using the bathroom become easier.

Informed Health Online [Internet] - Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG).

Version: July 9, 2008

After a stroke: What are the options for managing depression?

Antidepressants may not work in the way they are expected to for older people who have had strokes. The drugs might cause adverse effects such as increasing the risk of falls, so care is needed with their use.

Informed Health Online [Internet] - Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG).

Version: November 6, 2008

Stroke: Is there one type of physiotherapy that helps people regain more independence?

No one specific style of physiotherapy has been shown to be better than others. However, a mix of physiotherapy treatments that target specific problems like helping people learn to walk again can increase people's independence after a stroke.

Informed Health Online [Internet] - Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG).

Version: July 9, 2008

After a stroke: Does fitness training improve overall health and mobility?

Fitness training as part of a rehabilitation program after a stroke can increase physical fitness and endurance as well as improve mobility.

Informed Health Online [Internet] - Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG).

Version: January 19, 2012

Fact sheet: Coping psychologically after a stroke

Grief and sadness are normal after a stroke. Depending on how severe the stroke is, it can have an enormous impact on a person's life. People who used to lead independent lives before their stroke, and now rely on outside help, will have a lot of adjusting to do – both psychologically and in the practical aspects of their day-to-day life. Therapy can help people regain more independence, and most people and their families will gradually adjust to the changes in their lives.

Informed Health Online [Internet] - Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG).

Version: January 3, 2013

After a stroke: Does treatment with dipyridamole and ASA have a benefit?

A combination therapy of dipyridamole and ASA has more adverse effects than clopidogrel or ASA alone. It is not proven that the combination drug has benefits over clopidogrel or ASA alone.

Informed Health Online [Internet] - Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG).

Version: August 30, 2011

Anticoagulants for preventing stroke in patients with nonrheumatic atrial fibrillation and a history of stroke or transient ischaemic attack

Anticoagulants are beneficial and safe for preventing a second stroke in people with nonrheumatic atrial fibrillation and recent cerebral ischaemia. Nonrheumatic atrial fibrillation (NRAF) is a heart rhythm disorder commonly found in patients who have had a stroke. Patients with NRAF have an irregular heart beat and this can cause the formation of a blood clot in the left atrium of the heart . This clot may break away and block a cerebral artery causing a stroke. Patients who have had a stroke in the presence of NRAF have a high risk of another stroke. Anticoagulant drugs, such as warfarin, make the blood 'thinner' and prevent the formation of blood clots and hence could prevent stroke. However, anticoagulant drugs may also cause bleeding in the brain and this complication could offset any benefits. This review identified two trials in which patients with NRAF who had a stroke were treated with anticoagulant therapy. These studies show that anticoagulants safely reduce the risk of recurrent stroke by two‐thirds, despite a higher chance of major extracranial bleeds. There was no increased risk of intracranial bleeds.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2011

Stroke liaison workers for stroke patients and carers

Many patients experience depression, anxiety and isolation after a stroke. These post‐stroke problems can lead to subsequent poor health, low mood or increased caring burden. It seems reasonable to expect that providing more emotional and psychological support in addition to appropriate information about stroke and services available might help to reduce anxiety, improve mood and improve health or satisfaction. In this review, we evaluated 16 studies (involving 4759 participants) of healthcare workers or volunteers (a 'stroke liaison worker') providing education and social support (including counselling) and liaison with services. Overall, there do not appear to be any significant benefits for patients in terms of their perceived health, mood, activities or participation. Patients appeared to be more satisfied that someone had really listened to them, and carers appeared to be more satisfied with aspects of the care provided. It also appears that patients with mild to moderate disability may benefit from a reduction in disability and death as a result of the input from the stroke liaison worker. The reason for this is not yet clear and further research is required.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2010

Interventions for apraxia of speech following stroke

No evidence was found for the treatment of apraxia of speech, a communication disorder that can affect stroke patients. Patients with apraxia of speech know what they want to say, but are unable to carry out the speech movements due to their inability to programme the required sequence. For example, a patient may be able to say goodbye when leaving someone (automatic), but not when asked to say goodbye out of context (volitional). Several types of treatment interventions have been identified; however, we were unable to find any clinical trials of these.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2008

Anticoagulants versus antiplatelet therapy for preventing stroke in patients with nonrheumatic atrial fibrillation and a history of stroke or transient ischemic attack

Anticoagulants are more effective than antiplatelet drugs to prevent a second stroke in people with atrial fibrillation. Nonrheumatic atrial fibrillation (NRAF) is a heart rhythm disorder commonly found in patients who have had a stroke. Patients with NRAF have an irregular heart beat. This can cause the formation of a blood clot in the left atrium of the heart. This clot may break away and block a cerebral artery, thus causing a stroke. Patients who have had a stroke in the presence of NRAF have a high risk of another stroke. Anticoagulant drugs, such as warfarin, make the blood 'thinner' and prevent the formation of blood clots and hence could prevent stroke. However, anticoagulant drugs may also cause bleeding in the brain and this complication could offset any benefits. Aspirin may be a safer alternative. This review identified two trials in which patients with NRAF who had a stroke were treated with anticoagulants or antiplatelet therapy. These studies show that anticoagulants are superior to antiplatelet agents to reduce the risk of recurrent stroke.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2011

Chuanxiong‐type preparations for acute ischemic stroke

Stroke is a common disorder. It is due either to blockage of an artery in the brain or to bleeding in the brain. Chuanxiong is a Traditional Chinese Medicine. It is widely used in China for the treatment of patients with stroke. Two poor quality trials involving 161 participants were included in this review. The authors did not find any strong evidence about its effects. Well‐designed and conducted trials will be needed to provide reliable evidence to show whether this intervention does more good than harm.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2008

Antiplatelet therapy for preventing stroke in patients with non‐valvular atrial fibrillation and no previous history of stroke or transient ischemic attacks

Antiplatelet agents like aspirin are effective for preventing serious vascular events in patients with atrial fibrillation not suitable for oral anticoagulants. Atrial fibrillation is an irregularity of the heartbeat that leads to blood clots forming in the upper chambers of the heart (the atria). These clots can break free and travel through the bloodstream to the brain and cause a stroke. Drugs that slow clotting, such as antiplatelet agents (aspirin and others) and anticoagulants reduce the risk of stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation. In this review the benefits of antiplatelet agents are shown to be modest (nearly 25% decrease in stroke), but they are relatively safe, easy to take, and therefore an important treatment option for many atrial fibrillation patients. Anticoagulation with warfarin and related drugs offers more protection against stroke (nearly two‐thirds reduction), but anticoagulant drugs can cause severe bleeding and require careful regulation with regular blood tests. The choice of antiplatelet drugs versus anticoagulants should be individualized based on the patient's inherent risk of stroke, ability to tolerate anticoagulation without bleeding, access to adequate anticoagulation monitoring, and patient preferences.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2011

Gangliosides for acute ischaemic stroke

There is no evidence that treatment with ganglioside reduces disability after stroke. Drugs which can reduce disability in people who survive an acute stroke are needed. Gangliosides are a component of cells membranes and can protect neurons against injuries and enhance their growth. Ganglioside treatment has been tested in many clinical trials, mostly on patients with stroke. The results of these studies were inconclusive. This review shows that there is no evidence in favour of this treatment for patients with acute stroke. Gangliosides can rarely cause damage to nerves (acute neuropathy).

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2010

Chuanxiong preparations to prevent stroke in people at high risk of stroke

Stroke is a major healthcare problem. It is one of the leading causes of death and serious long‐term disability. Prevention of stroke is considered to be an important strategy. Some Traditional Chinese Medicines are used to try and prevent stroke because evidence suggests that they can improve blood circulation, dilate blood vessels, lower blood pressure, inhibit thrombosis, regulate lipid metabolism and other functions. We looked for evidence on the effects of Chuanxiong, a treatment widely used in China to treat and prevent stroke.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2010

Cerebrolysin for acute ischaemic stroke

Cerebrolysin, a mixture derived from pigs' brain tissue, is widely used in Russia and China. We reviewed evidence from randomised controlled trials investigating cerebrolysin in people with acute ischaemic stroke. This review of one trial, involving 146 participants, showed no clear effect of cerebrolysin for acute ischaemic stroke. No adverse effects specific to cerebrolysin were reported. The medication and methodology of the trial were provided by the manufacturer of cerebrolysin, EBEWE Pharma. There is insufficient evidence that cerebrolysin may be helpful with the management of acute ischaemic stroke.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2010

Puerarin for acute ischaemic stroke

Puerarin, a form of herbal medicine, is widely used in China. We reviewed evidence from randomised or quasi‐randomised controlled trials investigating puerarin in patients with acute ischaemic stroke. This review of one trial, involving 98 participants, showed no clear effect of puerarin for ischaemic stroke. No serious adverse effects were reported. There is insufficient evidence that puerarin may be helpful with the management of acute ischaemic stroke. Results from much larger randomised trials are needed to assess accurately the benefits and harms of puerarin in acute ischaemic stroke.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2008

Interventions for motor apraxia following stroke

People with motor apraxia after stroke often have difficulty carrying out everyday activities such as making a hot drink. Some people cannot select the right object at the right time or have difficulty using objects (such as a spoon) correctly. Apraxia is not due to muscle weakness or sensory loss. Instead it seems to be a loss or disturbance of the conceptual ability to organise actions to achieve a goal. This review of three studies, including 132 participants, suggests that further high quality research is required before specific treatment techniques can be accepted or rejected. Patients with apraxia should continue to receive general stroke rehabilitation services but better quality research is needed to identify optimal apraxia treatments.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2008

Corticosteroids for acute ischaemic stroke

There is no evidence of benefit from corticosteroids for acute ischaemic stroke. Stroke from blockage of an artery to a part of the brain causes swelling of that part of the brain. The swelling produces pressure effects, may cause additional brain cells to die, or delays the recovery of damaged but recoverable brain cells. Reduction of this swelling may relieve pressure on adjacent parts of the brain, reduce the number of brain cells that are killed and allow better recovery of damaged brain cells. Corticosteroids have been used to reduce this brain swelling in order to help limit damage and speed recovery. However, from the small and inadequate amount of evidence available from eight trials involving 466 participants, this review found no benefit of corticosteroids on reducing the number of deaths or improving functional outcome in survivors.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2011

Prostacyclin and analogues for acute ischaemic stroke

Prostacyclin and related drugs, which can dilate brain blood vessels, are of no apparent benefit in the early treatment of strokes caused by blood clots. Most strokes are caused by a blood clot which then reduces blood flow in the affected part of the brain. Without an adequate blood supply, the brain quickly suffers damage which is often permanent. Drugs which can thin blood and improve brain blood flow might reduce damage and improve outcome after stroke. Prostacyclin and related drugs have the ability to thin blood and increase brain blood flow. This systematic review assesses whether this type of drug improves outcome after stroke. The review identified five small trials which, when taken together, did not find any benefit. The limited amount of data mean that there is no evidence at present to suggest that prostacyclin and related drugs should be used in acute stroke.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2008

Recent Activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...