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Infection after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

Bibliographic details: Xu CM, Yang L, Hu CL, Hu YH.  Infection after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Chinese Journal of Tissue Engineering Research 2013; 17(5): 938-944 Available from: http://www.wendangwang.com/doc/dd49a3e58719c2fb2cfe285b

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2013

Double‐bundle versus single‐bundle reconstruction for anterior cruciate ligament rupture in adults

Anterior cruciate ligament injury is a common soft‐tissue knee injury. Patients with anterior cruciate ligament deficiency, especially young physically active males, usually do not return to pre‐injury level of activities due to knee instability. Surgical treatment of ACL rupture involves reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament by use of a graft (a piece of tendon usually obtained from the patient) that is passed through tunnels drilled into the tibia and femur at the insertion points of the ligament and then fixed. Repair may use a single‐bundle or double‐bundle technique. The ACL mainly consists of two distinct portions or 'bundles'. In single‐bundle reconstruction, one of these bundles is restored whereas in double‐bundle reconstruction, both are restored. Double‐bundle reconstruction may give greater knee stability but is more technically demanding and invasive than single‐bundle reconstruction. This review aimed to find out if double‐bundle reconstruction gives a better result than single‐bundle reconstruction.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2012

Hamstring muscle strength before and after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a systematic review

Bibliographic details: Moloney C, O'Sullivan K, O'Farrell D, Louw Q, Clifford AM.  Hamstring muscle strength before and after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a systematic review. Isokinetics and Exercise Science 2014; 22 (3): 225-236

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2014

Knee stability after double-bundle and single-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a systematic review

Bibliographic details: Shi J J, Ji B P.  Knee stability after double-bundle and single-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a systematic review. Chinese Journal of Evidence-Based Medicine 2008; 8(5): 364-369

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2008

Bracing after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: systematic review and meta-analysis

Bibliographic details: Kinikli GI, Callaghan MJ, Parkes MJ, Yuksel I.  Bracing after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: systematic review and meta-analysis. Turkiye Klinikleri Spor Bilimleri 2014; 6(1): 28-38 Available from: http://www.turkiyeklinikleri.com/article/tr-bracing-after-anterior-cruciate-ligament-reconstruction-systematic-review-and-meta-analysis-68540.html

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2014

A systematic review of bracing following reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament

Bibliographic details: Smith T O, Davies L.  A systematic review of bracing following reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament. Physiotherapy 2008; 94(1): 1-10

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2008

Meta-analysis on double-bundle versus single-bundle autoallergic hamstring for the reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament

Bibliographic details: Xu MM, Yu XH, Luo X, Ma CY, Zhao ZY.  Meta-analysis on double-bundle versus single-bundle autoallergic hamstring for the reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament. Chinese Journal of Tissue Engineering Research 2013; 17(4): 744-749

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2013

Surgical versus conservative interventions for treating anterior cruciate ligament injuries

Rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in the knee is a common injury in young, active individuals. It often results in an unstable knee that increases the risk of further knee damage, such as to the knee meniscii. Anterior cruciate ligament injuries in athletic individuals are often treated surgically. Surgery usually entails ACL reconstruction, that involves removing the torn ligament and replacing it with a tendon graft, often taken from another part of the patient's knee. Conservative (non‐surgical) interventions are also used as treatment for this injury. This usually takes the form of a progressive rehabilitation programme that includes exercises aimed at improving strength and balance. We aimed to assess the effects of surgical versus conservative interventions for treating ACL injuries.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2016

Early versus delayed surgery for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a systematic review and meta-analysis

There is no consensus in the literature regarding the optimal timing of surgical reconstruction of the ruptured anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). Previous authors have suggested that early reconstruction may facilitate an early return to work or sport but may increase the incidence of post-operative complications such as arthrofibrosis. This study systematically reviewed the literature to determine whether ACL reconstruction should be performed acutely following rupture. Medline, CINAHL, AMED, EMBASE databases and grey literature were reviewed with a meta-analysis of pooled mean differences where appropriate. Six papers including 370 ACL reconstructions were included. Early ACL reconstructions were considered as those undertaken within a mean of 3 weeks post-injury; delayed ACL reconstructions were those undertaken a minimum of 6 weeks post-injury. We found there was no difference in clinical outcome between patients who underwent early compared to delayed ACL reconstruction. However, this conclusion is based on the current literature which has substantial methodological limitations.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2010

Tourniquet used in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a systematic review

PURPOSE: To identify whether routine use of a tourniquet is a better choice for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2014

Is reconstruction the best management strategy for anterior cruciate ligament rupture? A systematic review and meta-analysis comparing anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction versus non-operative treatment

AIMS: The purpose of this study was to determine the optimal clinical and cost-effective strategy for managing people following ACL rupture.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2013

Clinical outcome of simultaneous high tibial osteotomy and anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction for medial compartment osteoarthritis in young patients with anterior cruciate ligament-deficient knees: a systematic review

PURPOSE: High tibial osteotomy (HTO) has been a well-established procedure addressing tibiofemoral osteoarthritis in young patients. However, for physically active patients with concomitant anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, simultaneous HTO and ACL reconstruction is considered a salvage procedure. Controversy exists regarding the subjective and objective evaluations and the prevalence of complications.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2014

Computer‐assisted surgery for knee ligament reconstruction

The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) are centrally located ligaments in the knee. An ACL injury is common in sports such as football and basketball, while PCL injury is far less common. An operation to reconstruct the ACL, usually with a tendon, is one of the most frequently performed orthopaedic procedures. It is very important to perform this operation accurately to obtain a satisfactory outcome and a computer may be able to assist with this. This review set out to examine the evidence for using an additional computer during the operation to help with the positioning of the bone tunnels in which to place the replacement tendon.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2014

Computer-navigated surgery in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: are radiographic outcomes better than conventional surgery?

PURPOSE: The use of computer navigation systems in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) has been the subject of debate. However, there is a lack of systematic review to analyze the radiographic outcomes after computer-navigated ACL reconstruction.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2011

The optimal timing for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with respect to the risk of postoperative stiffness

PURPOSE: The aim of this meta-analysis was to compare the risk of stiffness between early and delayed anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) surgery in studies that use a modern accelerated rehabilitation protocol.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2013

A systematic review of single- versus double-bundle ACL reconstruction using the anatomic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction scoring checklist

PURPOSE: The aim of this systematic review was to apply the anatomic ACL reconstruction scoring checklist (AARSC) and to evaluate the degree to which clinical studies comparing single-bundle (SB) and double-bundle (DB) ACL reconstructions are anatomic.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2014

Does computer navigation system really improve early clinical outcomes after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction? A meta-analysis and systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

Inaccurate tunnel placement is an important cause of failure in conventional anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Controversy currently exists over the usefulness of computer-assisted navigation systems in addressing this problem. Five randomized or quasi-randomized, controlled trials comparing computer-navigated versus conventional technique in ACL reconstructions until December 1, 2009 were identified through a systematical database search. The clinical outcomes of the trials were analyzed by Lachman test, pivot-shift test, International Knee Documentation Committee knee score, Lysholm score, and Tegner score. Mean difference or risk ratio with 95% confidence interval was calculated using a fixed-effects or random-effects model. Heterogeneity across the studies was also assessed. We found that the use of computer-assisted navigation systems led to additional operative time (8-17min). No significant differences between computer-navigated and conventional groups were found in terms of knee stability and functional assessment during short-term follow-up. The role of computer-assisted navigation systems on clinical performance and longevity needs further investigation in large sample, long-term randomized trials.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2012

Bioabsorbable versus metal screw for graft fixation in the surgical treatment of anterior cruciate ligament injury

The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is a knee ligament that functions to stabilise the knee. ACL injuries are more common in athletes, such as football, basketball and handball players. Many people with ACL injuries are treated with surgery to reconstruct this ligament. In ACL reconstruction, a replacement ligament (graft) is attached to tunnels drilled into the end of the femur (thigh bone) and tibia (shin bone). Often screws are used to attach the graft to the bone. Traditionally, metal screws have been used. Although these are generally successful, metallic screws can be hard to remove if further surgery is required. They also interfere with looking at the knee using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). With the aim of avoiding these disadvantages, and in response to patient requests, screws made ​​from materials that dissolve over time (bioabsorbable screws) were introduced. However, such screws have been reported to have increased risks of inflammation, infection, and failed surgery.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2016

The influence of graft choice on isokinetic muscle strength 4-24 months after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

PURPOSE: Regaining adequate strength of the quadriceps and hamstrings after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is important for maximizing functional performance. However, the outcome of muscle strength after either BPTB or hamstrings autograft is unclear given the plethora of published studies that report post-operative muscle strength. The purpose of this study was to systematically compare the muscle strength of patients who have undergone ACL reconstruction using either Bone Patellar Tendon Bone (BPTB) or Hamstrings (HST) autograft.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2011

The effect of patient and injury factors on long-term outcome after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

BACKGROUND: Long-term follow-up is required for accurate assessment of results after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction and recent years have witnessed the publication of numerous papers detailing long-term outcomes. The primary aim of this systematic review was to determine which patient factors affect long-term clinical and radiographic outcomes based on the current literature.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2011

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