Home > Search Results

Results: 1 to 20 of 124

Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) for the treatment of obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD)

Transcranial magnetic stimulation was introduced as neurophysiological technique in 1985 when Anthony Barker and his team developed a compact machine that permitted a non‐invasive stimulation of the cerebral cortex. In addition it has been suggested that TMS could have therapeutic potential. Its' capability for excitation or inhibition of cortical areas in a non‐invasive way represents a remarkable advance in neuroscience researches. Some studies have evaluated the therapeutic effects of repetitive TMS in controlled studies on patients with obsessive‐compulsive disorder observing some changes in their behaviour in terms of compulsive urges or improvements in mood. This review has evaluated the current evidence for TMS as a therapeutic treatment for obsessive‐compulsive disorder (OCD). There is a lack of evidence for the effect of TMS in the treatment of OCD.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2009

Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) for depression

Transcranial magnetic stimulation can either excite or inhibit cortical areas of the brain, depending on whether the speed of the repetitive stimulation is applied at high or low frequencies. It has been used for physiological studies and it has also been proposed as a treatment for depression. Sixteen trials were included in the review and fourteen contained data in a suitable form for quantitative analysis. Most comparisons did not show differences between repetitive (rTMS) and other interventions. No difference was seen between rTMS and sham TMS using the Beck Depression Inventory or the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, except for one time period (after two weeks of treatment) for left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and high frequency; and also for right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and low frequency, both in favour of rTMS and both using the Hamilton scale. Comparison of rTMS (left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and high frequency) with electroconvulsive therapy showed no difference except for psychotic patients after two weeks treatment, using the Hamilton scale, which indicated that electroconvulsive therapy was more effective than rTMS.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2009

Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) for treating amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), which is also known as motor neuron disease (MND), is a fatal disease in which the nerves in the brain and spinal cord that control movement degenerate. Treatments have little effect on how the disease progresses. People with ALS develop muscle weakness and paralysis of limb muscles and muscles involved in swallowing and breathing. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a method for exciting nerve cells in superficial areas of the brain. It applies pulsed magnetic fields to the surface of the brain via an electrode on the scalp. There have been trials to see if rTMS is effective in people with ALS.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2013

Transcranial magnetic stimulation for tinnitus

Tinnitus can be described as the experience of sound in the ear or in the head. Subjective tinnitus is not heard by anyone else. The exact cause of tinnitus remains unknown. At present no particular treatment has been found effective in all patients. Recently, researchers have been able to image the brain using specialised techniques (such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and positron emission tomography (PET)). This has led us to believe that high spontaneous neuronal activity in the central auditory system and associated areas may responsible for the perception of tinnitus. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a non‐invasive means of inducing electrical currents in the brain and can decrease this neuronal activity. The purpose of this Cochrane Review was to assess the effectiveness and safety of rTMS for the treatment of tinnitus.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2011

Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for the Treatment of Adults with PTSD, GAD, or Depression: A Review of Clinical Effectiveness and Guidelines [Internet]

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), and depression are psychiatric disorders that interfere with daily-life activities. In Canada, the prevalence of PTSD is approximately 12%, 2.6% for GAD and 8% for depression. These mental disorders result from brain dysregulation, such as neurological over-arousal (e.g. anxiety), neurological under-arousal (e.g. depression) or instable-arousal (e.g. PTSD), in that patients have problems in intentionally controlling neural functioning. Patients with mental health disorders usually require pharmacological and/or psychological interventions such as cognitive-behavioral therapy, however approximately two-thirds of patients with major depressive disorder do not have adequate responses to conventional treatments.

Rapid Response Report: Summary with Critical Appraisal - Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health.

Version: October 31, 2014
Show search results within this document

Meta-analysis of transcranial magnetic stimulation to treat post-stroke dysfunction

Bibliographic details: Tian Y, Kang L, Wang H, Liu Z.  Meta-analysis of transcranial magnetic stimulation to treat post-stroke dysfunction. Neural Regeneration Research 2011; 6(22): 1736-1741

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2011

Transcranial magnetic stimulation for treatment of epilepsy

Epilepsy is a common neurological disorder that appears in various forms. Many individuals with epilepsy have satisfactory seizure control with the use of antiepileptic medications. Yet, nearly a third of individuals suffer from frequent and uncontrolled seizures despite taking medications, or find that they cannot tolerate the side‐effects of those medications. Surgery is an option for some individuals with uncontrolled seizures, but it is invasive and not suitable for all individuals. Therefore, there remains a substantial unmet need for safe, effective therapies for these harder‐to‐treat epilepsies.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2016

Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) for panic disorder

Panic disorder is a common mental disorder and its lifetime prevalence is 5.1%. The major characteristic of panic disorder is the occurrence of unexpected panic attacks with consequent anxiety about experiencing another attack. Despite major advances in the treatment, many people with panic disorder do not respond well to either medication or psychological therapy. In recent years, an association was found between panic symptoms and increased activity in the right frontal region of the brain. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a new technique for the stimulation of the central nervous system. It works through placing an electromagnetic coil against the scalp, which generates a rapidly changing magnetic field to induce localised electrical currents. Low frequency rTMS can reduce this increased activity in the brain and so rTMS is emerging as a new way to treat people with panic disorder. Some studies have investigated the effect of rTMS on patients with PD and observed a reduction in anxiety levels. The aim of this review was to combine the results of all the randomised controlled trials of rTMS for panic disorder to investigate the effectiveness and safety of this treatment.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2014

Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) for the treatment of schizophrenia

Transcranial magnetic stimulation is a relatively new and sophisticated device‐based therapy. TMS involves the skilful application of a strong magnetic field close to the surface of the scalp. The TMS device delivers strong and very brief magnetic pulses that stimulate the brain and its network of neurons. TMS is a relatively painless and non‐invasive technique that stimulates parts of the brain (the cerebral cortex). Brain activity has been shown to differ in people with schizophrenia compared to other people.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2015

VA Evidence-based Synthesis Program Evidence Briefs [Internet]

The Department of Veterans Affairs, Health Services Research & Development Service (HSR&D) Evidence-based Synthesis Program (ESP) provides timely and accurate evidence briefs on targeted healthcare topics of particular importance to VA managers and policymakers, as they work to improve the health and healthcare of Veterans. The ESP disseminates these briefs throughout VA.

Department of Veterans Affairs (US).

Version: 2011
Show search results within this document

Effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on stroke patients with aphasia: a systematic review

Bibliographic details: Wang P, Zhang JQ, Yu JD, Zhang BB, Gu S, Yang LY, Yang YH, Wang L, He CQ.  Effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on stroke patients with aphasia: a systematic review. Chinese Journal of Evidence-Based Medicine 2014; 14(12): 1497-1503

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2014

Efficiency of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on rehabilitation of motor function in patients with stroke: a systematic review

Bibliographic details: Zhu Y, Yang YJ, Gu YH, Xie B, Jin HZ.  Efficiency of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on rehabilitation of motor function in patients with stroke: a systematic review. Chinese Journal of Tissue Engineering Research 2013; 17(50): 8758-8768 Available from: http://www.crter.org/CN/abstract/abstract5573.shtml

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2013

Effectiveness of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in stroke patients with motor dysfunction: a systematic review

Bibliographic details: Wang J, Zhu F, Wang P, Liao WJ, Guo Y, Li HG.  Effectiveness of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in stroke patients with motor dysfunction: a systematic review. Chinese Journal of Evidence-Based Medicine 2012; 12(12): 1478-1488 Available from: http://www.cjebm.org.cn/en/oa/DArticle.aspx?type=view&id=20121209

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2012

Effectiveness and safety of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in patients with post-stroke motor dysfunction: a meta-analysis

Bibliographic details: Yang F, Liu L, Guo RB, Li M, Zhang RL, Gu YS, Liu HB, Chen GH.  Effectiveness and safety of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in patients with post-stroke motor dysfunction: a meta-analysis. Chinese Journal of Cerebrovascular Diseases 2012; 9(6): 284-290 Available from: http://lib.cqvip.com/qk/87378X/201206/42673273.html

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2012

The effect of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on upper extremity motor function in stroke patients: a meta-analytical review

Bibliographic details: Tang IN.  The effect of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on upper extremity motor function in stroke patients: a meta-analytical review. Journal of Food and Drug Analysis 2012; 20(1): 1-5 Available from: http://jfda.fda.gov.tw/JFDA_II/portal_d9_cnt_page.php?button_num=d9&folder_id=2&cnt_id=1040

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2012

Low frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) for major depressive disorder: a systematic review

Bibliographic details: Lin JB, Liao WJ, Wang P, Li HG, Guo Y.  Low frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) for major depressive disorder: a systematic review. Chinese Journal of Evidence-Based Medicine 2011; 11(10): 1192-1198 Available from: http://www.cjebm.org.cn/oa/DArticle.aspx?type=view&id=201110017

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2011

Effectiveness of high- and low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation for treating dysfunction in patients with Parkinson's disease: a meta-analysis

Bibliographic details: Wang P, Gou Y, Liao WJ, Li HG.  Effectiveness of high- and low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation for treating dysfunction in patients with Parkinson's disease: a meta-analysis. Chinese Journal of Evidence-Based Medicine 2010; 10(11): 1308-1315

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2010

[Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation for post-stroke dysphagia: a systematic review of the literature]

Bibliographic details: Liu L, Liu HB, Wang XL, Kong L, Gu YS, Chen GH, Yang F.  [Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation for post-stroke dysphagia: a systematic review of the literature]. Chinese Journal of Cerebrovascular Diseases 2014; 11(5): 250-255, 269 Available from: http://caod.oriprobe.com/articles/41682470/Repetitive_transcranial_magnetic_stimulation_for_post_stroke_dysphagia.htm

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2014

Efficacy of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in depression: a review of the evidence

Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a novel treatment in psychiatry. We reviewed all published evidence on the efficacy of this treatment option in depressive disorders. An extensive electronic and manual search for eligible research reports identified only 12 studies that met the predetermined criteria for inclusion. rTMS was administered differently in most studies, and patient characteristics varied widely. A formal meta-analysis of the studies was thus not possible. Instead, we conducted a qualitative evaluation of the included studies. The antidepressive efficacy was not consistent, and where efficacy was demonstrated, it was modest in most studies. Some patients had good but transient responses to rTMS. Treatment gains were not maintained beyond the treatment period. Comparisons with electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) indicated the superiority of ECT. More, larger and more carefully designed studies are needed to demonstrate convincingly a clinically relevant effect of rTMS. We conclude that there is insufficient evidence for rTMS as a valid treatment for depression at present.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2003

Transcranial magnetic stimulation and transcranial direct current stimulation: treatments for cognitive and neuropsychiatric symptoms in the neurodegenerative dementias?

INTRODUCTION: Two methods of non-invasive brain stimulation, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), have demonstrable positive effects on cognition and can ameliorate neuropsychiatric symptoms such as depression. Less is known about the efficacy of these approaches in common neurodegenerative diseases. In this review, we evaluate the effects of TMS and tDCS upon cognitive and neuropsychiatric symptoms in the major dementias, including Alzheimer's disease (AD), vascular dementia (VaD), dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), Parkinson's disease with dementia (PDD), and frontotemporal dementia (FTD), as well as the potential pre-dementia states of Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) and Parkinson's disease (PD).

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2014

Systematic Reviews in PubMed

See all (394)...

Systematic Review Methods in PubMed

See all (2)...

Recent Activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...