Home > Search Results

A condition characterized by pain that persists more than 3 months after healing of a shingles rash. Caused by damage to the nervous system.

Results: 1 to 20 of 52

Valacyclovir and postherpetic neuralgia

Bibliographic details: Segarra-Newnham M, Tagoff S S.  Valacyclovir and postherpetic neuralgia. Journal of Pharmacy Technology 2004; 20(4): 229-232

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2004

Meta-analysis of gabapentin in the treatment of postherpetic neuralgia

Bibliographic details: Zhang WW, Li MQ, Liu L.  Meta-analysis of gabapentin in the treatment of postherpetic neuralgia. Chinese Journal of Contemporary Neurology and Neurosurgery 2013; 13(9): 760-765

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2013

Jiaji points combined with surrounding needling for the treatment of postherpetic neuralgia: a meta-analysis

Bibliographic details: Zhu Y, Zhu LT, Li N, Li Y, Jin HZ.  Jiaji points combined with surrounding needling for the treatment of postherpetic neuralgia: a meta-analysis. Journal of Clinical Rehabilitative Tissue Engineering Research 2011; 15(11): 2064-2068 Available from: http://new.med.wanfangdata.com.cn/Paper/Detail?id=PeriodicalPaper_xdkf201111041

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2011

Practice parameter: treatment of postherpetic neuralgia. An evidence-based report of the Quality Standards Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology

A systematic review of the literature on postherpetic neuralgia was performed. The authors identified studies using the National Library of Medicine's Medline database and Cochrane Library database. The authors determined absolute reduction rate, number needed to treat (NNT), 95% CI for NNT, and number needed to harm (NNH) for successful therapies of postherpetic neuralgia. Tricyclic antidepressants, gabapentin, pregabalin, opioids, and lidocaine patch were found to be effective in reducing the pain of postherpetic neuralgia.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2004

Neuraxial and sympathetic blocks in herpes zoster and postherpetic neuralgia: an appraisal of current evidence

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Epidural, intrathecal, and sympathetic blocks are used for the treatment of pain caused by herpes zoster (HZ) and postherpetic neuralgia (PHN). This study was undertaken to evaluate and synthesize existing evidence for using these nerve blocks with various injectates (local anesthetic [LA] alone, LA + steroids) in treating pain of HZ, PHN (>6 months), and its prevention.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2004

Systematic review and meta-analysis of efficacy, safety, and tolerability data from randomized controlled trials of drugs used to treat postherpetic neuralgia

OBJECTIVE: To conduct a systematic review of available data from reports of randomized controlled trials on the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of drugs used to treat postherpetic neuralgia (PHN), a common type of neuropathic pain.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2011

Analgesic therapy in postherpetic neuralgia: a quantitative systematic review

The authors concluded that there was support for the use of tricyclic antidepressants, certain opioids, gabapentinoids and topical lidocaine and capsaicin. Overall, the review was well-conducted and the authors' conclusion reflects the evidence presented.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2005

Cost-effectiveness of vaccination against herpes zoster and postherpetic neuralgia: a critical review

OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to systematically review cost-effectiveness studies of vaccination against herpes zoster (HZ) and postherpetic neuralgia (PHN).

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2014

Efficacy and safety of gabapentin for treatment of postherpetic neuralgia: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

BACKGROUND: Postherpetic neuralgia (PHN) is a common type of neuropathic pain occurring after resolution of herpes zoster rash. Although gabapentin is a widely used treatment, some disagreements exist about its efficacy and safety. Meta-analysis was performed to better evaluate the efficacy and safety of gabapentin for management of PHN.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2014

Systematic review and meta-analysis of pharmacological therapies for pain associated with postherpetic neuralgia and less common neuropathic conditions

OBJECTIVE: To estimate the relative efficacy of pharmacological therapies for the treatment of postherpetic neuralgia (PHN), multiple sclerosis (MS)-related pain, posttraumatic pain, central poststroke pain (CPSP) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related neuropathic pain (NeP).

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2014

Vaccination for preventing postherpetic neuralgia

Postherpetic neuralgia is a painful condition that occurs in patients after they have been affected by a recurrence of the herpes zoster virus (shingles). The pain may persist for years and is often difficult to treat. Herpes zoster virus vaccination is a possible new approach to prevent herpes zoster and postherpetic neuralgia. We identified a single high quality trial with a total of 38,546 participants, comparing vaccination with placebo. It found a significant reduction of herpes zoster, but did not provide enough direct evidence to draw any conclusion about whether the vaccine is effective in preventing postherpetic neuralgia beyond its effect on reducing herpes zoster. Non‐serious adverse events were more common among vaccine recipients than placebo recipients, but serious ones were rare. More well designed and specialised trials of vaccination for preventing postherpetic neuralgia are required.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2011

Corticosteroids for preventing postherpetic neuralgia

Postherpetic neuralgia is a painful condition that is one of the most common complications of an acute herpes zoster infection. Herpes zoster presents as a localised rash resembling localised chicken pox, often called 'shingles'. Postherpetic neuralgia may persist lifelong once it occurs and has major implications for quality of life and use of healthcare resources. Corticosteroids have a potent anti‐inflammatory action, which it has been suggested might minimise nerve damage and thereby relieve or prevent the pain experienced by people suffering from this condition. Five trials were identified from a systematic search of the literature which were of high enough quality to be included in the review. These trials involved 787 participants in total. We were able to combine the results from two trials (114 participants) and there was no significant difference between the corticosteroid and control groups in the presence of postherpetic neuralgia six months after the onset of the acute herpetic rash. Two of the three other included trials reported results at less than one month, so these participants did not fulfil the current criteria for a diagnosis of postherpetic neuralgia. The last trial reported results in a format unsuitable for meta‐analysis. There were no significant differences in serious or non‐serious adverse events between the corticosteroids and placebo groups. There was also no significant difference between the treatment groups and placebo groups in other secondary outcome analyses and subgroup analyses. It can be concluded that, based on moderate quality evidence, corticosteroids are not effective in preventing postherpetic neuralgia.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2013

Antiviral treatment for preventing nerve pain after shingles (postherpetic neuralgia)

We reviewed the evidence about the effect of antiviral medicines for preventing postherpetic neuralgia (PHN).

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2014

5% lidocaine-medicated plaster vs other relevant interventions and placebo for post-herpetic neuralgia (PHN): a systematic review

Several pharmacological treatments are used to manage post-herpetic neuralgia (PHN). The use of topical analgesics, such as 5% lidocaine-medicated plaster (5% LMP), may be preferable to systemic treatments in that they are formulated to produce a local pain relieving effect with minimal systemic absorption. However, direct head-to-head comparisons are relatively few, and a rigorous assessment of the relative efficacy and safety of the various treatment options is lacking. The objective of this study was to compare 5% LMP for the relief of PHN with other relevant interventions and placebo. Six databases were searched up to May 2010. Quantitative methods for data synthesis were used, and a network meta-analysis was conducted. Twenty unique studies (32 publications) were included. Placebo-controlled studies showed 5% LMP to be effective in providing pain relief and reducing allodynia while adverse event rates were generally low. A comparison between 5% LMP and pregabalin indicated the non-inferiority of 5% LMP for pain reduction and showed greater improvement of quality of life for 5% LMP. Adverse events (AE) were significantly fewer with 5% LMP. In the network meta-analysis, only 5% LMP and gabapentin were associated with a greater change in pain from baseline than placebo [-15.50 (95% CI -18.85 to -12.16) and -7.56 (95% CI -12.52 to -2.59) respectively]. 5% LMP was shown to be more effective than capsaicin [-16.45 (95% CI -20.04 to -12.86)], gabapentin [-7.95 (95% CI -13.29 to -2.61)] and pregabalin [-13.45 (95% CI -19.19 to -7.71)]. For pain relief, two comparators were more effective than placebo [mean pain relief, gabapentin: 32.77 (95% CI 15.57-49.97); 5% LMP: 26.77 (95% CI 9.11-44.43)]. 5% LMP was shown to be comparable to gabapentin [-6.00 (95% CI -25.32-13.32)]. The results suggest that 5% LMP and gabapentin have similar effects on pain relief and that 5% LMP is more effective than capsaicin and pregabalin (change in pain from baseline). Topical agents, such as 5% LMP, are associated with fewer and less clinically significant AE than is the case for systemic agents. However, small numbers, and limited size and quality of included studies should be taken into account. Further studies are needed.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2011

Gabapentin versus tricyclic antidepressants for diabetic neuropathy and post-herpetic neuralgia: discrepancies between direct and indirect meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials

This review concluded that there was no difference in pain relief between gabapentin and tricyclic antidepressants in patients with diabetic neuropathy or post-herpetic neuralgia, although direct evidence was limited. The review was well conducted and these findings are likely to be reliable.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2009

Lasting pain after a shingles infection

Pain that continues for a long time after a shingles rash has disappeared is called postherpetic neuralgia. It is the most common complication of shingles. It is still not clear how it can be prevented or what the best treatment is.Shingles usually causes a rash accompanied by pain in the affected area. The pain usually goes away together with the rash. This is usually the case after two to four weeks. Pain that continues for longer is referred to as “postherpetic neuralgia.” In very rare cases pain can come back after a shingles infection, even if it had already gone away and the rash had healed.The main symptom of postherpetic neuralgia is pain in the nerves (neuralgia). The skin is often overly sensitive and itchy as well. This can make it difficult or painful to wash, turn over in bed, or hold someone in your arms. The pain and itching can be very severe and might even keep you from sleeping.

Informed Health Online [Internet] - Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG).

Version: November 19, 2014

Pregabaline et traitement des douleurs neuropathiques: revue de la litterature [Pregabalin for the treatment of neuropathic pain: selected review of the literature]

Bibliographic details: Leheup B F.  Pregabaline et traitement des douleurs neuropathiques: revue de la litterature [Pregabalin for the treatment of neuropathic pain: selected review of the literature]. Douleurs 2006; 7(6): 304-311

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2006

The adverse event profile of pregabalin: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

The review concluded that individuals starting pregabalin treatment were at increased risk of several adverse events, particularly those affecting cognition/co-ordination, which followed a dose-response relationship. The review was generally well conducted, but the potential issues with trial quality and the small number of trials for some adverse events limit the reliability of the results.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2011

The evidence for pharmacological treatment of neuropathic pain

This review concluded that a 66% increase in published trials since 2005 showed only a limited improvement in neuropathic pain. A large proportion of patients with neuropathic pain had insufficient pain relief. Limitations of the statistical methods and heterogeneity between studies suggest the results should be viewed with caution when comparing the effectiveness of types of interventions.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2010

Systematic review of topical capsaicin for the treatment of chronic pain

This review evaluated topically applied capsaicin for the treatment of chronic neuropathic and musculoskeletal pain. The authors concluded that capsaicin had a poor to moderate efficacy, but may be useful in people unresponsive to, or intolerant of other treatments. Apparent differences across the included studies and the lack of an analysis of data for this subgroup suggest that the conclusions may not be reliable.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2004

Systematic Reviews in PubMed

See all (141)...

Recent Activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...