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The pharmacological treatment of aggressive fibromatosis: a systematic review

BACKGROUND: Despite the use of surgery and radiotherapy, 20-35% of patients with aggressive fibromatosis (AF) will have local recurrence. The purpose of this review was to collect and analyze all available information regarding the role of non-cytotoxic and cytotoxic chemotherapy in AF that has been accumulated over the past few decades.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2003

Uterine-Preserving Interventions for the Management of Symptomatic Uterine Fibroids: A Systematic Review of Clinical and Cost-Effectiveness [Internet]

Uterine fibroids are the most common pelvic tumours and the most common benign tumours in women. Usually diagnosed late in a woman’s reproductive life, fibroids are present in up to 40% of women older than 40 years. Fibroid-related symptoms are often divided into menstrual symptoms, such as heavy bleeding, or bulk-related symptoms that result from the enlargement of the uterus. Common symptoms include abnormal uterine bleeding, pelvic pressure and pain, infertility, recurrent pregnancy loss, and decreased quality of life. Medications or surgical interventions may be needed to treat fibroids. Hysterectomy is a definitive solution for many women; however, alternatives that preserve fertility and avoid invasive surgery do exist. The less-invasive uterine-preserving alternatives include myomectomy, uterine artery embolization or occlusion (UAE or UAO), myolysis, and endometrial ablation. Each carries its own safety and effectiveness profile, and the treatment of fibroids must be individualized depending on such factors as symptoms, size and location of fibroids, age, desire for future pregnancy or preservation of the uterus, the availability of therapy, physician experience, and patient preference.

Rapid Response Report: Systematic Review - Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health.

Version: January 2016
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Genetics of Skin Cancer (PDQ®): Health Professional Version

Expert-reviewed information summary about the genetics of skin cancer — basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and melanoma — including information about specific gene mutations and related cancer syndromes. The summary also contains information about interventions that may influence the risk of developing skin cancer in individuals who may be genetically susceptible to these syndromes.

PDQ Cancer Information Summaries [Internet] - National Cancer Institute (US).

Version: July 22, 2016

Unusual Cancers of Childhood Treatment (PDQ®): Health Professional Version

Expert-reviewed information summary about the treatment of unusual cancers of childhood such as cancers of the head and neck, chest, abdomen, reproductive system, skin, and others.

PDQ Cancer Information Summaries [Internet] - National Cancer Institute (US).

Version: August 17, 2016

Unusual Cancers of Childhood Treatment (PDQ®): Patient Version

Expert-reviewed information summary about the treatment of unusual cancers of childhood such as cancers of the head and neck, chest, abdomen, reproductive system, skin, and others.

PDQ Cancer Information Summaries [Internet] - National Cancer Institute (US).

Version: August 10, 2016

Alcohol Consumption and Cancer Risk: Understanding Possible Causal Mechanisms for Breast and Colorectal Cancers

The purpose of this report is to systematically examine the possible causal mechanism(s) that may explain the association between alcohol (ethanol) consumption and the risk of developing breast and colorectal cancers.

Evidence Reports/Technology Assessments - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: November 2010
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Diagnosis and Management of Metastatic Malignant Disease of Unknown Primary Origin

The term “cancer of unknown primary” refers to a condition in which a patient has metastatic malignancy without an identified primary source. This is a very heterogeneous disease in which the type of tumour, the extent of spread, and the outcome of treatment all vary widely. When categorising patients with cancer of unknown primary, one important factor initially considered is the cell type of origin of the metastatic disease. The majority of patients have malignancy which appears to derive from epithelial cells, and hence are regarded as having carcinoma of unknown primary. Patients with tumours of non-epithelial lineage (melanoma, sarcoma, lymphoma, germ-cell) form a distinct and important minority, since subsequent management can often be satisfactorily undertaken even in the absence of an identifiable primary source. Such patients are not considered in this guideline, since their care is adequately defined in existing guidelines for their specific tumour type. The term “carcinoma of unknown primary” (CUP) is used henceforth to refer to those patients with metastatic malignancy of epithelial, neuroendocrine or undifferentiated lineage whose investigation and management is considered within the scope of this guideline.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Cancer (UK).

Version: July 2010
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