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Treats or prevents nausea and vomiting caused by cancer medicines. This medicine is used when other medicines for nausea and vomiting do not work.

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Results: 14

Nabilone for Non-chemotherapy Associated Nausea and Weight Loss due to Medical Conditions: A Review of the Clinical Effectiveness and Guidelines [Internet]

Cannabis has been used medically for its antiemetic, sedative, and analgesic effects and for its ability to stimulate appetite. The major psychoactive ingredient of cannabis is delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). Nabilone is a synthetic cannabinoid analog of THC and is approved for use in Canada for the treatment of severe nausea and vomiting associated with chemotherapy in adults over the age of 18 years. For its approved indication, nabilone (1 mg to 2 mg) is used short-term, administered the night before and one to three hours prior to chemotherapy and can be continued up to 24 hours following chemotherapy. A systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) found that 70% of patients undergoing chemotherapy who received cannabinoids had complete control of nausea compared to 57% of placebo patients (RR 1.21; 95% CI 1.03 to 1.42). As well, 66% of patients had complete control of vomiting with cannabinoids compared to 36% of patients treated with placebo (RR 1.84; 95% CI 1.42 to 2.38).

Rapid Response Report: Summary with Critical Appraisal - Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health.

Version: September 12, 2014
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Long-term Nabilone Use: A Review of the Clinical Effectiveness and Safety [Internet]

The purpose of this Rapid Response report is to summarize the evidence of clinical efficacy and harms associated with evidence of efficacy and safety of long-term nabilone use in adult populations with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and other chronic conditions.

Rapid Response Report: Summary with Critical Appraisal - Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health.

Version: October 16, 2015
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Nabilone for non-chemotherapy associated nausea and weight loss due to medical conditions: a review of the clinical effectiveness and guidelines

Bibliographic details: Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health.  Nabilone for non-chemotherapy associated nausea and weight loss due to medical conditions: a review of the clinical effectiveness and guidelines. Ottawa (ON), Canada: Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health. Rapid Response Report. 2014

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2014

Drug Class Review: Drugs for Fibromyalgia: Final Original Report [Internet]

We compared the effectiveness and harms of tricyclic antidepressants, serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, selective serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, noradrenergic and specific serotonergic reuptake inhibitor, norepinephrine and dopamine reuptake inhibitor, serotonin receptor antagonist, antiepileptic drugs, and skeletal muscle relaxants in adults with fibromyalgia.

Drug Class Reviews - Oregon Health & Science University.

Version: April 2011
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Dementia: A NICE-SCIE Guideline on Supporting People With Dementia and Their Carers in Health and Social Care

This guideline has been developed to advise on supporting people with dementia and their carers in health and social care. The guideline recommendations have been developed by a multidisciplinary team of health and social care professionals, a person with dementia, carers and guideline methodologists after careful consideration of the best available evidence. It is intended that the guideline will be useful to practitioners and service commissioners in providing and planning high-quality care for those with dementia while also emphasising the importance of the experience of care for people with dementia and carers.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Mental Health (UK).

Version: 2007
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Cannabis and Cannabinoids (PDQ®): Patient Version

Expert-reviewed information summary about the use of Cannabis and cannabinoids in the treatment of cancer-related side effects, such as nausea and vomiting.

PDQ Cancer Information Summaries [Internet] - National Cancer Institute (US).

Version: January 8, 2016

Cannabis and Cannabinoids (PDQ®): Health Professional Version

Expert-reviewed information summary about the use of Cannabis and cannabinoids in the treatment of cancer-related side effects, such as nausea and vomiting.

PDQ Cancer Information Summaries [Internet] - National Cancer Institute (US).

Version: January 20, 2016

Nausea and Vomiting (PDQ®): Patient Version

Expert-reviewed information summary about nausea and vomiting as complications of cancer or its treatment. Approaches to the management of nausea and vomiting are discussed.

PDQ Cancer Information Summaries [Internet] - National Cancer Institute (US).

Version: September 2, 2015

Neuropathic Pain: The Pharmacological Management of Neuropathic Pain in Adults in Non-specialist Settings [Internet]

This short clinical guideline aims to improve the care of adults with neuropathic pain by making evidence-based recommendations on the pharmacological management of neuropathic pain outside of specialist pain management services. A further aim is to ensure that people who require specialist assessment and interventions are referred appropriately and in a timely fashion to a specialist pain management service and/or other condition-specific services.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - Centre for Clinical Practice at NICE (UK).

Version: November 2013
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Nausea and Vomiting (PDQ®): Health Professional Version

Expert-reviewed information summary about nausea and vomiting as complications of cancer or its treatment. Approaches to the management of nausea and vomiting are discussed.

PDQ Cancer Information Summaries [Internet] - National Cancer Institute (US).

Version: January 4, 2016

Depression in Adults with a Chronic Physical Health Problem: Treatment and Management

This clinical guideline was commissioned by NICE and developed by the National Collaborating Centre for Mental Health. It sets out clear, evidenceand consensus-based recommendations for healthcare staff on how to treat and manage depression in adults with a chronic physical health problem.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Mental Health (UK).

Version: 2010
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Therapeutic use of Cannabis sativa on chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting among cancer patients: systematic review and meta-analysis

The review concluded that dronabinol was statistically and clinically more effective as an anti-emetic than neuroleptics. Nabilone and levonantradol were not statistically more effective than neuroleptics, but were clinically more effective. There were some methodological problems with the review and the authors’ statement that caution was warranted when interpreting the results appears justified.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2008

Cannabinoids for treatment of chronic non-cancer pain: a systematic review of randomized trials

This generally well-conducted review concluded that cannabinoids were safe and modestly effective for chronic non-cancer (predominately neuropathic) pain, with preliminary evidence in fibromyalgia and rheumatoid arthritis. The authors' conclusions may only be reliable for short-term treatment as included trial treatment periods were relatively short (maximum of six weeks).

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2011

Adverse effects of medical cannabinoids: a systematic review

This systematic review aimed to assess the safety of medical cannabinoids. The authors concluded that short-term use of medical cannabinoids appears to increase the risk of non-serious adverse events, but that risks associated with long-term use were poorly reported. Overall this was a well conducted systematic review and the authors' conclusions are likely to be reliable.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2008

Systematic Reviews in PubMed

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