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Effectiveness of bromocriptine monotherapy or combination treatment with clomiphene for infertility in women with galactorrhea and normal prolactin: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Bibliographic details: Xue T, Li SW, Wang Y.  Effectiveness of bromocriptine monotherapy or combination treatment with clomiphene for infertility in women with galactorrhea and normal prolactin: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Current Therapeutic Research 2010; 71(4): 199-210

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2010

Off-Label Use of Atypical Antipsychotics: An Update [Internet]

Antipsychotic medications are approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for treatment of schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and for some drugs, depression. We performed a systematic review on the efficacy and safety of atypical antipsychotic drugs for use in conditions lacking FDA approval.

Comparative Effectiveness Reviews - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: September 2011
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Primary Care Management of Abnormal Uterine Bleeding [Internet]

The Vanderbilt Evidence-based practice Center systematically reviewed evidence about interventions for symptomatic abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB), both irregular and cyclic. We focused on interventions that are suitable for use in primary care practice including medical, behavioral, and complementary and alternative medicine approaches.

Comparative Effectiveness Reviews - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: March 2013
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Drug Class Review: Atypical Antipsychotic Drugs: Final Update 3 Report [Internet]

Atypical antipsychotic agents are used to treat the symptoms of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. The purpose of this review is to help policy makers and clinicians make informed choices about their use. Given the prominent role of drug therapy in psychiatric disease, our goal is to summarize comparative data on efficacy, effectiveness, tolerability, and safety. Ten atypical antipsychotics are currently available in the United States and Canada. Clozapine, the prototypic atypical antipsychotic, was introduced in 1989. Since then, 9 other atypical antipsychotics have been brought to market: risperidone (1993), risperidone long-acting injection (2003), olanzapine (1996), quetiapine (1997), ziprasidone (2001), aripiprazole (2002), extended-release paliperidone (2006), asenapine (2009), iloperidone (2009), and paliperidone long-acting injection (2009).

Drug Class Reviews - Oregon Health & Science University.

Version: July 2010
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Treatment of hyperprolactinemia: a systematic review and meta-analysis

The evidence supported the use of dopamine agonists to treat hyperprolactinaemia and reduce associated morbidity; cabergoline was more effective than bromocriptine. Radiotherapy and surgery were efficacious in patients resistant to dopamine agonists. This well-conducted review acknowledged the low quality of the evidence, imprecision and heterogeneity of the results. These limitations should be taken into account when interpreting the conclusions.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2012

Cabergoline versus bromocriptine in the treatment of hyperprolactinemia: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials and meta-analysis

The review found cabergoline was significantly more effective than bromocriptine in normalising prolactin level, reducing persistent amenorrhoea, menses normalisation and returning normal ovulatory cycles in treatment of prolactinomas and idiopathic hyperprolactinaemia. Cabergoline also had significantly fewer adverse events. Substantial differences between studies for the main outcome and relatively low patient numbers make the reliability of the authors’ conclusions unclear.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2011

First-Generation Versus Second-Generation Antipsychotics in Adults: Comparative Effectiveness [Internet]

To compare individual first-generation antipsychotics (FGAs) with individual second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs) in adults (18 to 64 years) with schizophrenia, schizophrenia-related psychoses, or bipolar disorder, with a focus on core illness symptoms, functional outcomes, health care system utilization, and adverse events.

Comparative Effectiveness Reviews - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: August 2012
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Bipolar Disorder: The Management of Bipolar Disorder in Adults, Children and Adolescents, in Primary and Secondary Care

This guideline has been developed to advise on the treatment and management of bipolar disorder. The guideline recommendations have been developed by a multidisciplinary team of healthcare professionals, patients and guideline methodologists after careful consideration of the best available evidence. It is intended that the guidelines will be useful to clinicians and service commissioners in providing and planning high quality care for those with bipolar disorder while also emphasising the importance of the experience of care for patients and carers.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Mental Health (UK).

Version: 2006
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Late Effects of Treatment for Childhood Cancer (PDQ®): Health Professional Version

Expert-reviewed information summary about the health problems that continue or appear after cancer treatment has ended.

PDQ Cancer Information Summaries [Internet] - National Cancer Institute (US).

Version: January 29, 2015

Treatment for Depression After Unsatisfactory Response to SSRIs [Internet]

A comparative effectiveness review was undertaken to evaluate treatment strategies in patients who failed to respond to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) as first-line treatment. The efficacy (benefits and harms) of monotherapy approaches (dose escalation, increased duration, or switch) or combined therapies were evaluated. Efficacy in the context of subgroups was also evaluated. Recommendations in Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPGs) from 2004 to April 2011 were compared.

Comparative Effectiveness Reviews - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: April 2012
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Quetiapine versus typical antipsychotic drugs for schizophrenia

Antipsychotic drugs are the main treatment for schizophrenia, helping to treat both the positive symptoms (such as hearing voices, seeing things and having strange beliefs) and negative symptoms (including apathy, tiredness and loss of emotion) of this illness. Selecting the most effective antipsychotic drug that can be tolerated by people with schizophrenia is crucial to successful treatment. Older drugs (also known as typical or first generation antipsychotic drugs), such as chlorpromazine and haloperidol, have been used in treating schizophrenia for over 50 years. Although these older drugs are good at treating the positive symptoms of schizophrenia they tend to cause undesirable side effects. These side effects can mean that people do not tolerate or like taking these drugs, which may lead to relapse and admission to hospital. Since 1988, a newer generation of antipsychotic drugs has become available. These new drugs (known as atypical or second generation antipsychotic drugs) are effective in treating the symptoms of schizophrenia but thought to have less side effects than older drugs. However, although newer drugs may cause less side effects such as movement disorders, they have been linked to other side effects like heart problems or weight gain. Quetiapine is a new antipsychotic drug for schizophrenia that has been available for over a decade. However, it is not clear how the effects of quetiapine differ from older antipsychotic drugs. This review evaluated the effectiveness and tolerability of quetiapine versus older antipsychotic drugs. The review included 43 trials with a total of 7217 people. Most studies were from China. In the main, quetiapine did not differ from older drugs for the treatment of positive symptoms of mental illness. There were also no clear differences in terms of the treatment of negative symptoms. However, it is important to note that evidence from these trials suggests quetiapine causes fewer side effects (such as weight gain, dizziness, movement disorders, the inability to sit still, shaking, tremors and abnormal levels of the hormone prolactin, which can contribute to sexual and mental health problems). However, evidence from the trials is limited due to high numbers of people leaving early in almost all of the studies. More evidence through the completion of well designed studies comparing quetiapine with older antipsychotic drugs is needed.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2013

A systematic review of atypical antipsychotic drugs in schizophrenia

The clinical effectiveness, safety and cost-effectiveness of 'atypical' antipsychotic drugs in schizophrenia were compared with conventional antipsychotic drugs, placebo and other atypical antipsychotic drugs.

NIHR Health Technology Assessment programme: Executive Summaries - NIHR Journals Library.

Version: 2003

Pituitary Tumors Treatment (PDQ®): Health Professional Version

Expert-reviewed information summary about the treatment of pituitary tumors.

PDQ Cancer Information Summaries [Internet] - National Cancer Institute (US).

Version: July 27, 2012

First- and Second-Generation Antipsychotics for Children and Young Adults [Internet]

To review and synthesize the evidence on first-generation antipsychotics (FGA) and second-generation antipsychotics (SGA) for the treatment of various psychiatric and behavioral conditions in children, adolescents, and young adults (ages ≤ 24 years).

Comparative Effectiveness Reviews - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: February 2012
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Systematic Reviews in PubMed

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