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The use of drugs to slow or stop progression of arthritis related to cystic fibrosis

Arthritis is not a common complication of cystic fibrosis, but it can cause major problems when it does occur. There are two distinct types of arthritis in cystic fibrosis: cystic fibrosis‐related arthropathy and hypertrophic pulmonary osteoarthropathy. The best treatment for these types of arthritis is not clear because of cystic fibrosis and its intense treatment. Some drugs can treat the symptoms of arthritis by reducing inflammation of the joints and relieving pain, but only disease modifying anti‐rheumatic drugs can stop or slow progression of the disease. We planned to report evidence from clinical trials which compared different disease‐modifying drugs compared with placebo (or dummy treatment), with each other or with no treatment. However, we were disappointed that we could not find any completed randomised controlled trials of these treatments or any evidence from non‐randomised controlled trials. We suggest that there should be a randomised controlled trial to look at the effects and the safety of using disease modifying anti‐rheumatic drugs to slow or stop the progression of arthritis in people with cystic fibrosis.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2015

The use of drugs to manage symptoms in people with arthritis related to cystic fibrosis

Arthritis is not a common complication of cystic fibrosis, but it can be a major complication when it does occur. There are two distinct types of arthritis in cystic fibrosis: cystic fibrosis‐related arthropathy and hypertrophic pulmonary osteoarthropathy. The best treatment for these conditions is not clear because of the underlying disease and its intense treatment. We planned to report evidence from clinical studies to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of different anti‐inflammatory analgesic drugs compared with placebo, with each other or with no treatment. However, we were disappointed that we could not find any completed randomised controlled studies of these treatments or any evidence from non‐randomised controlled studies. One study in cystic fibrosis‐related arthropathy has finished and may provide some evidence when published. We suggest that there should be a randomised controlled study to look at the effects and the safety of using anti‐inflammatory drugs or painkillers or both to manage the symptoms of cystic fibrosis‐related arthritis. This is an update of a previously published review (date of last search 19 January 2016). Since no studies have been included in the review up until January 2016, we will still search for studies every two years, but will not publish an updated version of this review until we can include any new studies.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2016

Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Health Professional Version

Expert-reviewed information summary about the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer.

PDQ Cancer Information Summaries [Internet] - National Cancer Institute (US).

Version: July 7, 2016

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