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Screening for Glaucoma: Comparative Effectiveness [Internet]

Open-angle glaucoma (OAG) is the most common form of progressive optic neuropathy, and it is estimated that more than half of those who have glaucoma are undiagnosed. The objective of this review was to assess the effect of screening for OAG. We also summarized the accuracy of diagnostic tests.

Comparative Effectiveness Reviews - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: April 2012
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Glaucoma: Diagnosis and Management of Chronic Open Angle Glaucoma and Ocular Hypertension

This guideline covers adults (18 and older) with a diagnosis of chronic open angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension and those with chronic open angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension associated with pseudoexfoliation or pigment dispersion. In addition, the guideline will cover populations who have a higher prevalence of glaucoma and may have worse clinical outcomes including people with a family history of glaucoma, younger people (<50 years) and people who are of black African or black Caribbean descent. Options for pharmacological, surgical, laser and complimentary or alternative treatments are considered in terms of clinical effectiveness and cost effectiveness.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Acute Care (UK).

Version: April 2009
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Treatment for Glaucoma: Comparative Effectiveness [Internet]

Glaucoma is a leading cause of visual impairment and blindness worldwide. Treatment focuses on the reduction of intraocular pressure (IOP), which secondarily prevents worsening of visual field loss; in this way, available treatments may prevent visual impairment and blindness. The objective of this Comparative Effectiveness Review is to summarize the evidence regarding the safety and effectiveness of medical, laser, and other surgical treatments for open-angle glaucoma in adults.

Comparative Effectiveness Reviews - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: April 2012
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Visual Dysfunction in Patients with Traumatic Brain Injury: A Systematic Review [Internet]

In 2009, approximately 3.5 million people sought treatment related to a traumatic brain injury (TBI) in the United States (U.S.), just over 1% of the U.S. population. Researchers estimate that approximately 15% of Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation New Dawn (OEF/OIF/OND) U.S. Service Members have incurred TBI during deployment. This equates to 390,000 of the 2.6 million Service Members who have deployed as of 2014. Given that intact visual functioning depends on portions of the brain interacting in complex ways, there are multiple potential mechanisms through which TBI can result in visual dysfunction. To provide relevant data for policymakers, optometrists, ophthalmologists, rehabilitation specialists, and others who provide services for Veterans with TBI history, we conducted a systematic review of the prevalence and types of visual dysfunction in individuals with a history of TBI.

Evidence-based Synthesis Program - Department of Veterans Affairs (US).

Version: September 2014
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Surveillance for Ocular Hypertension: An Evidence Synthesis and Economic Evaluation

To determine effective and efficient monitoring criteria for ocular hypertension [raised intraocular pressure (IOP)] through (i) identification and validation of glaucoma risk prediction models; and (ii) development of models to determine optimal surveillance pathways.

Health Technology Assessment - NIHR Journals Library.

Version: June 2012
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Stable Angina: Methods, Evidence & Guidance [Internet]

Angina is pain or constricting discomfort that typically occurs in the front of the chest (but may radiate to the neck, shoulders, jaw or arms) and is brought on by physical exertion or emotional stress. It is the main symptomatic manifestation of myocardial ischaemia and is usually caused by obstructive coronary artery disease restricting oxygen delivery to the cardiac myocytes. Other factors may exacerbate angina either by further restricting oxygen delivery (for example severe anaemia) or by increasing oxygen demand (for example left ventricular hypertrophy). Angina symptoms are associated with other cardiac disease such as aortic stenosis but the management of angina associated with non-coronary artery disease is outside the scope of this guideline.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Clinical Guidelines Centre (UK).

Version: July 2011
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Comparative Effectiveness of Percutaneous Coronary Interventions and Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting for Coronary Artery Disease [Internet]

Atherosclerosis develops in a patchy, discontinuous fashion within coronary arteries. Therefore, it is possible to treat the discrete areas of obstruction that most impede coronary blood flow to the myocardium. The mechanical approaches to coronary revascularization fall broadly into two categories: coronary artery bypass grafting surgery (CABG) and catheter-based percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI). Together, these coronary revascularization methods are among the most common major medical procedures performed in North America and Europe.

Comparative Effectiveness Reviews - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: October 2007
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