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J Okla State Med Assoc. 2008 Jan;101(1):15-9.

An update on breast cancer in Oklahoma and the dietary changes women make after diagnosis.

Author information

  • 1College of Allied Health, The University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Department of Nutrition, P.O. Box 26901, 801 N.E. 13th Street, Room 469, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73190, USA.

Abstract

CONTEXT:

The breast cancer (BC) death rate in Oklahoma exceeds that of the United States. Women commonly experience weight gain after diagnosis and soy isoflavones may interfere with effect of tamoxifen.

OBJECTIVE:

To assess dietary changes of BC survivors and to determine if the women desire information about diet from physicians.

DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS:

Retrospective cross-sectional study of women BC survivors in clinic and community settings in central Oklahoma.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Dietary changes, use of soy foods and supplements, physician advice about dietary changes.

RESULTS:

A total of 224 BC survivors were surveyed (81 in clinics and 143 at Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure). Median weight change was zero kg (IQR -0.23 to 4.55 kg). Mean weight change was 1.6 kg (95% CI -0.1 to 3.4 kg). Half the women said they had taken tamoxifen. Of those, 78% said they had never consumed or were eating the same amount of soy foods. Only 16% of women on tamoxifen ate more soy foods. Only 30% of women received any specific dietary advice from their physician, but over half said they would like more information. Most common dietary changes included decreased consumption of sugar, sweets, and regular soda, red meats, shortening, margarine, high fat dairy products, and alcohol. Women ate more olive oil, whole grains, vegetables, fruit, poultry, and low-fat dairy foods.

PMID:
18390235
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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