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Prog Neuropsychopharmacol Biol Psychiatry. 2016 Apr 3;66:54-62. doi: 10.1016/j.pnpbp.2015.11.010. Epub 2015 Nov 28.

Modulation of brain network parameters associated with subclinical psychotic symptoms.

Author information

  • 1Psychiatry Service, University Hospital of Palencia, Palencia, Spain.
  • 2Biomedical Engineering Group, University of Valladolid, Valladolid, Spain.
  • 3Psychiatry Department, School of Medicine, University of Valladolid, Valladolid, Spain.
  • 4Neurophysiology Service, University Hospital of Valladolid, Valladolid, Spain.
  • 5Biomedical Engineering Group, University of Valladolid, Valladolid, Spain; Mathematics Research Institute (IMUVA), University of Valladolid, Valladolid, Spain; Neuroscience Institute of Castilla y León (INCYL), University of Salamanca, Salamanca, Spain.
  • 6Neuroscience Department, University of the Basque Country, Leioa, Spain; Psychiatry Service, University Hospital of Alava, Vitoria, Spain.
  • 7Psychiatry Department, School of Medicine, University of Valladolid, Valladolid, Spain; Neuroscience Institute of Castilla y León (INCYL), University of Salamanca, Salamanca, Spain; Psychiatry Service, University Hospital of Valladolid, Valladolid, Spain. Electronic address: vicente.molina@uva.es.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Static deficits in small-world properties of brain networks have been described in clinical psychosis, but task-related modulation of network properties has been scarcely studied. Our aim was to assess the modulation of those properties and its association with subclinical psychosis and cognition in the general population.

METHOD:

Closeness centrality and small-worldness were compared between pre-stimulus baseline and response windows of an odd-ball task in 200 healthy individuals. The correlation between modulation of network parameters and clinical (scores in the Community Assessment of Psychological Experiences) and cognitive measures (performance in the dimensions included in the Brief Assessment of Cognition in Schizophrenia battery) was analyzed, as well as between these measures and the corresponding network parameters during baseline and response windows during task performance.

RESULTS:

In the theta band, closeness centrality decreased and small-worldness increased in the response window. Centrality and small-worldness modulation were, respectively, directly and inversely associated with subclinical symptoms.

CONCLUSIONS:

A widespread modulation of network properties in theta band was observed, with a transient increase of small-worldness during the response window, compatible with a transiently more integrated cortical activity associated to cognition. This supports the relevance of electroencephalography to study of normal and altered cognition and its substrates. A relative deficit in the ability to reorganize brain networks may contribute to subclinical psychotic symptoms.

Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

KEYWORDS:

Electroencephalography (EEG); Graph theory; Healthy volunteers; Psychotic disorders; Small-world network

PMID:
26615765
[PubMed - in process]
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