Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination

See 1 citation found by title matching your search:

See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Pediatr. 2011 Oct;159(4):597-601.e1. doi: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2011.03.049. Epub 2011 May 17.

Postoperative surveillance and detection of postprandial hypoglycemia after fundoplasty in children.

Author information

  • 1Division of Endocrinology and Diabetes, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate the prevalence of postprandial hypoglycemia (PPH) after fundoplasty after the initiation of a universal postoperative glucose surveillance plan in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU).

STUDY DESIGN:

This was a retrospective chart review of children (newborn to 18 years) who underwent fundoplasty at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia during the 2-year-period after the launch of a surveillance protocol in the NICU and other units. The rate of screening, frequency of PPH (postprandial blood glucose <60 mg/dL [3.3 mmol/L] on 2 occasions), frequency of postprandial hyperglycemia preceding PPH, timing of PPH presentation, and related symptoms were evaluated.

RESULTS:

A total of 285 children were included (n = 64 in the NICU; n = 221 in other units). Of the children screened in all units, 24.0% showed evidence of PPH, compared with 1.3% of unscreened children. Hyperglycemia preceded PPH in 67.7% (21/31) of all screened children. Within the NICU, most children had PPH within 1 week, but only 53.3% exhibited symptoms of dumping syndrome.

CONCLUSIONS:

This study supports the use of universal postoperative blood glucose surveillance in identifying PPH in children after fundoplasty. Earlier identification of PPH would lead to earlier treatment and minimize the effects of unidentified hypoglycemic events.

Copyright © 2011 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

PMID:
21592499
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk