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Am J Public Health. 2004 Aug;94(8):1442-5.

Graphic Canadian cigarette warning labels and adverse outcomes: evidence from Canadian smokers.

Author information

  • 1Department of Psychology, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1, Canada. dhammond@uwaterloo.ca

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

We assessed the impact of graphic Canadian cigarette warning labels.

METHODS:

We used a longitudinal telephone survey of 616 adult smokers.

RESULTS:

Approximately one fifth of participants reported smoking less as a result of the labels; only 1% reported smoking more. Although participants reported negative emotional responses to the warnings including fear (44%) and disgust (58%), smokers who reported greater negative emotion were more likely to have quit, attempted to quit, or reduced their smoking 3 months later. Participants who attempted to avoid the warnings (30%) were no less likely to think about the warnings or engage in cessation behavior at follow-up.

CONCLUSIONS:

Policymakers should not be reluctant to introduce vivid or graphic warnings for fear of adverse outcomes.

PMID:
15284057
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC1448469
Free PMC Article

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