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J AAPOS. 2015 Aug;19(4):358-62. doi: 10.1016/j.jaapos.2015.06.001. Epub 2015 Jul 31.

Ophthalmic manifestations and outcomes after cavernous sinus thrombosis in children.

Author information

  • 1Oculoplastic and Orbital Surgery, Department of Ophthalmology, University of Colorado Hospital, Aurora.
  • 2Oculoplastic and Orbital Surgery, Department of Ophthalmology, University of Colorado Hospital, Aurora; Oculoplastic and Orbital Surgery, Department of Ophthalmology, San Antonio; Military Medical Center/Wilford Hall, San Antonio, Texas.
  • 3Department of Radiology, Childrens Hospital Colorado, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora.
  • 4Oculoplastic and Orbital Surgery, Department of Ophthalmology, University of Colorado Hospital, Aurora; Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of Colorado Hospital, Aurora; Texas Oculoplastic Consultants, Austin, Texas. Electronic address: vdurairaj@tocaustin.com.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To review the causes, treatment, and outcomes of cavernous sinus thrombosis (CST) in children.

METHODS:

The medical records of children (<18 years of age) diagnosed with thrombophlebitis of an intracranial venous sinus were reviewed to identify cases of CST presenting to Children's Hospital Colorado from January 2000 through January 2013. Cases were evaluated for etiology, symptoms, imaging characteristics, treatment, and outcomes.

RESULTS:

A total of 110 children with a venous thrombus of an intracranial sinus were included. Of these, 9 had a CST. All cases were confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging. All 9 had sinusitis, 4 had orbital involvement, and 1 resulted from a nasal septal abscess. Eight cases presented with ophthalmoplegia, and 5 presented with decreased vision. Every patient underwent sinus surgery: 4 underwent orbitotomy for abscess drainage, and 1 required bilateral exenteration. Cultures were inconclusive in 2 cases, and 2 cases were culture positive rhino-orbital mucormycosis. There was 1 case of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Of the 9 cases, 4 returned to normal vision and ocular motility; 5 had permanent ophthalmoplegia and vision loss. There were no cases of mortality.

CONCLUSIONS:

CST is a rare complication of orbital and sinus disease. High clinical suspicion, early neurologic imaging, and a multidisciplinary approach to management are key factors in reducing morbidity and mortality from CST in children.

Copyright © 2015 American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PMID:
26239205
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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