Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
Genome Biol. 2009;10(5):R55. doi: 10.1186/gb-2009-10-5-r55. Epub 2009 May 22.

Multi-tissue coexpression networks reveal unexpected subnetworks associated with disease.

Author information

  • 1Rosetta Inpharmatics, LLC, Merck & Co, Inc, Seattle, Washington 98109, USA. radu_dobrin@merck.com

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Obesity is a particularly complex disease that at least partially involves genetic and environmental perturbations to gene-networks connecting the hypothalamus and several metabolic tissues, resulting in an energy imbalance at the systems level.

RESULTS:

To provide an inter-tissue view of obesity with respect to molecular states that are associated with physiological states, we developed a framework for constructing tissue-to-tissue coexpression networks between genes in the hypothalamus, liver or adipose tissue. These networks have a scale-free architecture and are strikingly independent of gene-gene coexpression networks that are constructed from more standard analyses of single tissues. This is the first systematic effort to study inter-tissue relationships and highlights genes in the hypothalamus that act as information relays in the control of peripheral tissues in obese mice. The subnetworks identified as specific to tissue-to-tissue interactions are enriched in genes that have obesity-relevant biological functions such as circadian rhythm, energy balance, stress response, or immune response.

CONCLUSIONS:

Tissue-to-tissue networks enable the identification of disease-specific genes that respond to changes induced by different tissues and they also provide unique details regarding candidate genes for obesity that are identified in genome-wide association studies. Identifying such genes from single tissue analyses would be difficult or impossible.

PMID:
19463160
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2718521
Free PMC Article

Images from this publication.See all images (5)Free text

Figure 1
Figure 2
Figure 3
Figure 4
Figure 5
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for BioMed Central Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk