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Diabetes Care. 1995 Oct;18(10):1330-6.

Psychosocial status of children with diabetes in the first 2 years after diagnosis.

Author information

  • 1Yale University School of Nursing, New Haven, Connecticut USA. Margaret.Grey@yale.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The purpose of this study was to determine the pattern of adjustment over time of a cohort of children with newly diagnosed diabetes compared with a cohort of peer-selected children without diabetes over the first 2 years after the diagnosis of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM).

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS:

Children (n = 89 with IDDM, n = 53 without IDDM) ages 8-14 years were studied with the Children's Depression Inventory, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory for Children, Child and Adolescent Adjustment Profile, Self-Perception Profile for Children, and a general health scale. Initial data were collected within 6 weeks of the diagnosis of IDDM and at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months thereafter.

RESULTS:

There were no demographic differences between the two groups. Initially, children with diabetes were more depressed, more dependent, and more withdrawn than their peers. By 1 year postdiagnosis, there were no significant differences in psychosocial status between the two groups. By 2 years postdiagnosis, depression, dependency, and withdrawal were significantly higher in children with diabetes than in their peers without IDDM. Self-perceived competence remained similar between the two groups at all time points.

CONCLUSIONS:

After an initial period of adjustment, children with IDDM have equivalent psychosocial status to children without IDDM, but by 2 years after diagnosis, they have experienced twice the amount of depression and adjustment problems as their peers. Interventions should be aimed at this critical period between 1 and 2 years postdiagnosis.

PMID:
8721933
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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