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Psychiatry Res. 2014 Dec 15;220(1-2):391-6. doi: 10.1016/j.psychres.2014.07.065. Epub 2014 Aug 2.

The mediating role of avoidance coping between intimate partner violence (IPV) victimization, mental health, and substance abuse among women experiencing bidirectional IPV.

Author information

  • 1Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, USA.
  • 2Division of Prevention and Community Research and the Consultation Center, Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, 389 Whitney Ave, New Haven, CT 06518, USA.
  • 3Department of Psychology, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA.
  • 4Division of Prevention and Community Research and the Consultation Center, Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, 389 Whitney Ave, New Haven, CT 06518, USA. Electronic address: Tami.Sullivan@yale.edu.

Abstract

Avoidance coping is consistently linked with negative mental health outcomes among women experiencing intimate partner violence (IPV). This study extended the literature examining the potentially mediating role of avoidance coping strategies on both mental health and substance use problems to a highly generalizable, yet previously unexamined population (i.e., women experiencing bidirectional IPV) and examined multiple forms of IPV (i.e., psychological, physical, and sexual) simultaneously. Among a sample of 362 women experiencing bidirectional IPV, four separate path models were examined, one for each outcome variable. Avoidance coping mediated the relationships between psychological and sexual IPV victimization and the outcomes of PTSD symptom severity, depression severity, and drug use problems. Findings indicate nuanced associations among IPV victimization, avoidance coping, and mental health and substance use outcomes.

Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

KEYWORDS:

Coping; Depression; Intimate partner violence; Substance abuse; Traumatic stress; Women׳s mental health

PMID:
25174851
[PubMed - in process]
PMCID:
PMC4252854
Free PMC Article
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