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Vaccine. 2014 May 23;32(25):2945-7. doi: 10.1016/j.vaccine.2014.03.059. Epub 2014 Apr 5.

Sources of information for assessing human papillomavirus vaccination history among young women.

Author information

  • 1Yale School of Public Health and Connecticut Emerging Infections Program, 60 College Street, New Haven, CT 06520, USA. Electronic address: linda.niccolai@yale.edu.
  • 2Yale School of Public Health and Connecticut Emerging Infections Program, 60 College Street, New Haven, CT 06520, USA.

Abstract

Assessing history of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination is important for monitoring vaccine uptake, impact, and effectiveness. Based on data collected from 1720 women with high-grade cervical lesions reported to a statewide surveillance system in Connecticut, we found that available medical records did not contain HPV vaccination information for 34% of women, and 43% of women could not be reached for interview. When both were used for data collection, concordance of vaccination history (83%) and sensitivity of self-report (96%) were both high. Reviewing medical records based on self-reported information about vaccine providers increased confirmation of vaccination histories in this sample by 18%. The vaccine registry in Connecticut is not currently utilized for HPV vaccinations, but efforts to increase use for adolescent vaccines could be useful in the future to overcome limitations of other sources.

Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

KEYWORDS:

Human papillomavirus virus (HPV); Medical records; Surveillance; Vaccination; Vaccine effectiveness; Vaccine impact

PMID:
24713369
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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