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Clin Immunol. 2014 May-Jun;152(1-2):101-10. doi: 10.1016/j.clim.2014.03.003. Epub 2014 Mar 19.

Human monocytes have increased IFN-γ-mediated IL-15 production with age alongside altered IFN-γ receptor signaling.

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  • 1Department of Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520, USA.
  • 2Department of Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520, USA; Department of Pediatrics, Jeju National University School of Medicine, Jeju 690-756, Republic of Korea.
  • 3Department of Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520, USA. Electronic address: Insoo.kang@yale.edu.

Abstract

IL-15 is involved in regulating host defense and inflammation. Monocytes produce the biologically active cell surface IL-15 in response to IFN-γ. Although aging can alter the immune system, little is known about whether and how aging affects IFN-γ-mediated IL-15 production in human monocytes. We showed that monocytes of healthy older adults (age ≥ 65) had increased cell surface IL-15 expression in response to IFN-γ compared to those of healthy young adults (age ≤ 40). This finding stems in part from increased IFN-γ receptor (R)1/2 expression on monocytes in older adults, leading to enhanced STAT1 activation and interferon regulatory factor 1 synthesis with increased IL15 gene expression. Our study suggests that with aging the IFN-γ-mediated IL-15 production pathway in human monocytes is uncompromised, but rather augmented, and could be considered as a therapeutic target point to modulate host defense and inflammation in older adults.

Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

KEYWORDS:

Human; IFN-γ; IL-15; Monocytes and aging

PMID:
24657713
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC4018768
Free PMC Article
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