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Ann Thorac Surg. 2014 Apr;97(4):1149-55. doi: 10.1016/j.athoracsur.2013.12.045. Epub 2014 Feb 26.

Treating locally advanced disease: an analysis of very large, hilar lymph node positive non-small cell lung cancer using the National Cancer Data Base.

Author information

  • 1Section of Thoracic Surgery, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut.
  • 2Section of Medical Oncology, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut.
  • 3Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut.
  • 4Department of Biostatistics, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, Connecticut.
  • 5Medical Oncology, West Haven Connecticut Veteran's Affairs Hospital, West Haven, Connecticut.
  • 6Section of Thoracic Surgery, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut; Cardiothoracic Surgery, West Haven Connecticut Veteran's Affairs Hospital, West Haven, Connecticut. Electronic address: anthony.kim@yale.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Very large, locally advanced non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) remain a therapeutic challenge. This retrospective study compares the effect of treatment modalities on survival of patients with large NSCLC with hilar lymph node involvement (T3>7 cmN1).

METHODS:

The National Cancer Data Base was used to identify adult patients who were diagnosed with T3>7 cmN1 NSCLC from 1999 to 2005 (n=642). Nonsurgical treatments included chemoradiation, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, or no treatment, whereas primary surgical treatments included surgery, chemoradiation or chemotherapy prior to surgery, chemoradiation or chemotherapy after surgery, or postoperative radiotherapy. Five-year overall survival (OS) was estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method and comparisons made using log-rank tests and Cox regression models.

RESULTS:

A total of 642 patients were evaluated; 425 nonsurgical (66%) and 217 surgical (34%). Primary surgical therapy was associated with improved 5-year OS; 28% versus 8% and 4% for nonsurgical and no treatment, respectively (p<0.001). The 5-year OS were 11%, 5%, 2%, and 4% for chemoradiation, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and no treatment, respectively (p<0.001). The 5-year OS were 16% for surgery only, 40% and 44% for neoadjuvant chemoradiation or chemotherapy with surgery, respectively, 40% and 38% for adjuvant chemoradiation or chemotherapy with surgery, respectively, and 18% for postoperative radiotherapy (p<0.001). On multivariate analysis, surgery and chemotherapy in most combinations were associated with significantly improved OS compared with chemoradiation only.

CONCLUSIONS:

Surgery with systemic therapy delivered in a neoadjuvant or adjuvant fashion for patients with T3>7 cmN1 NSCLCs is associated with improvements in OS.

Copyright © 2014 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PMID:
24582051
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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