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Am Heart J. 2014 Mar;167(3):376-83. doi: 10.1016/j.ahj.2013.11.001. Epub 2013 Nov 7.

Age and sex differences in inhospital complication rates and mortality after percutaneous coronary intervention procedures: evidence from the NCDR(®).

Author information

  • 1Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT; Yale-New Haven Hospital Center for Outcomes Research and Evaluation, New Haven, CT. Electronic address: Judith.Lichtman@yale.edu.
  • 2Yale-New Haven Hospital Center for Outcomes Research and Evaluation, New Haven, CT.
  • 3Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT.
  • 4Department of Epidemiology, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, GA.
  • 5Denver VA Medical Center, Denver, CO.
  • 6Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT; Yale-New Haven Hospital Center for Outcomes Research and Evaluation, New Haven, CT; Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT.
  • 7Yale-New Haven Hospital Center for Outcomes Research and Evaluation, New Haven, CT; Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Older women experience higher complication rates and mortality after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) than men, but there is limited evidence about sex-based differences in outcomes among younger patients. We compared rates of complications and inhospital mortality by sex for younger and older PCI patients.

METHODS:

A total of 1,079,751 hospital admissions for PCI were identified in the CathPCI Registry(®) from 2005 to 2008. Complication rates (general, bleeding, bleeding with transfusion, and vascular) and inhospital mortality after PCI were compared by sex and age (<55 and ≥55 years). Analyses were adjusted for demographic and clinical factors and stratified by PCI type (elective, urgent, or emergency).

RESULTS:

Overall, 6% of patients experienced complications, and 1% died inhospital. Unadjusted complication rates were higher for women compared with men in both age groups. In risk-adjusted analyses, younger women (odds ratio 1.24, 95% CI 1.16-1.33) and older women (1.27, 1.09-1.47) were more likely to experience any complication than similarly aged men. The increased risk persisted across complication categories and PCI type. Within age groups, risk-adjusted mortality was marginally higher for young women (1.19, 1.00-1.41), but not for older women (1.03, 0.97-1.10). In analyses stratified by PCI type, young women had twice the mortality risk after an elective procedure as young men (2.04, 1.15-3.61).

CONCLUSIONS:

Women, regardless of age, experience more complications after PCI than men; young women are at increased mortality risk after an elective PCI. Identifying strategies to reduce adverse outcomes, particularly for women younger than 55 years, is important.

Copyright © 2014 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

PMID:
24576523
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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