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Am J Infect Control. 2014 Jan;42(1):7-11. doi: 10.1016/j.ajic.2013.06.018. Epub 2013 Oct 30.

Hospital-onset influenza hospitalizations--United States, 2010-2011.

Author information

  • 1Epidemiology and Prevention Branch, Influenza Division, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA. Electronic address: MJhung@cdc.gov.
  • 2Epidemiology and Prevention Branch, Influenza Division, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA.
  • 3Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, Denver, CO.
  • 4Department of Medicine, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, NY.
  • 5Rhode Island Department of Health, Providence, RI.
  • 6Georgia Division of Public Health, Georgia Emerging Infections Program, Emory University, Atlanta, GA.
  • 7Ohio Department of Health, Columbus, OH.
  • 8Oklahoma State Department of Health, Oklahoma City, OK.
  • 9New Mexico Department of Health, Santa Fe, NM.
  • 10Minnesota Department of Health, St Paul, MN.
  • 11California Emerging Infections Program, Oakland, CA.
  • 12Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Baltimore, MD.
  • 13Department of Preventive Medicine, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN.
  • 14Michigan Department of Community Health, Lansing, MI.
  • 15Idaho Department of Health and Welfare, Boise, ID.
  • 16Oregon Public Health Division, Portland, OR.
  • 17Salt Lake Valley Health Department, Salt Lake City, UT.
  • 18Connecticut Emerging Infections Program, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Seasonal influenza is responsible for more than 200,000 hospitalizations each year in the United States. Although hospital-onset (HO) influenza contributes to morbidity and mortality among these patients, little is known about its overall epidemiology.

OBJECTIVE:

We describe patients with HO influenza in the United States during the 2010-2011 influenza season and compare them with community-onset (CO) cases to better understand factors associated with illness.

METHODS:

We identified laboratory-confirmed, influenza-related hospitalizations using the Influenza Hospitalization Surveillance Network (FluSurv-NET), a network that conducts population-based surveillance in 16 states. CO cases had laboratory confirmation ≤ 3 days after hospital admission; HO cases had laboratory confirmation > 3 days after admission.

RESULTS:

We identified 172 (2.8%) HO cases among a total of 6,171 influenza-positive hospitalizations. HO and CO cases did not differ by age (P = .22), sex (P = .29), or race (P = .25). Chronic medical conditions were more common in HO cases (89%) compared with CO cases (78%) (P < .01), and a greater proportion of HO cases (42%) than CO cases (17%) were admitted to the intensive care unit (P < .01). The median length of stay after influenza diagnosis of HO cases (7.5 days) was greater than that of CO cases (3 days) (P < .01).

CONCLUSION:

HO cases had greater length of stay and were more likely to be admitted to the intensive care unit or die compared with CO cases. HO influenza may play a role in the clinical outcome of hospitalized patients, particularly among those with chronic medical conditions.

Published by Mosby, Inc.

KEYWORDS:

Health care associated

PMID:
24183534
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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