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Magn Reson Med. 2014 Sep;72(3):864-75. doi: 10.1002/mrm.24984. Epub 2013 Oct 21.

Noninvasive MRI measurement of the absolute cerebral blood volume-cerebral blood flow relationship during visual stimulation in healthy humans.

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  • 1Department of Biomedical Engineering, Yale University, School of Medicine, Magnetic Resonance Research Center, New Haven, Connecticut, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The relationship between cerebral blood volume (CBV) and cerebral blood flow (CBF) underlies blood oxygenation level-dependent functional MRI signal. This study investigates the potential for improved characterization of the CBV-CBF relationship in humans, and examines sex effects as well as spatial variations in the CBV-CBF relationship.

METHODS:

Healthy subjects were imaged noninvasively at rest and during visual stimulation, constituting the first MRI measurement of the absolute CBV-CBF relationship in humans with complete coverage of the functional areas of interest.

RESULTS:

CBV and CBF estimates were consistent with the literature, and their relationship varied both spatially and with sex. In a region of interest with stimulus-induced activation in CBV and CBF at a significance level of the P < 0.05, a power function fit resulted in CBV = 2.1 CBF(0.32) across all subjects, CBV = 0.8 CBF(0.51) in females and CBV = 4.4 CBF(0.15) in males. Exponents decreased in both sexes as ROIs were expanded to include less significantly activated regions.

CONCLUSION:

Consideration for potential sex-related differences, as well as regional variations under a range of physiological states, may reconcile some of the variation across literature and advance our understanding of the underlying cerebrovascular physiology.

Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

KEYWORDS:

Grubb's relationship; blood oxygenation level-dependent; brain activation; cerebral blood flow; cerebral blood volume; functional MRI; visual stimulation

PMID:
24151246
[PubMed - in process]
PMCID:
PMC3994201
[Available on 2015-09-01]
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