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J Diabetes. 2014 May;6(3):243-50. doi: 10.1111/1753-0407.12091. Epub 2013 Oct 29.

Safety of once-daily insulin detemir in patients with type 2 diabetes treated with oral hypoglycemic agents in routine clinical practice.

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  • 1Department of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The aim of the present study was to identify demographic and treatment factors that were predictive of hypoglycemia in a large cohort of type 2 diabetic patients initiating insulin detemir.

METHODS:

The present 24-week observational study of insulin initiation included 17 374 participants from 10 countries. Severe hypoglycemia was defined as an event requiring third party assistance; minor hypoglycemia was defined as a daytime or nocturnal glucose measurement <3.1 mmol/L.

RESULTS:

Prior to initiating insulin therapy, 4.9% of the cohort reported hypoglycemia (pre-insulin hypoglycemia), with most (94.2%) reporting minor events and 9.6% reporting severe events. Compared with patients without pre-insulin hypoglycemia, those with pre-insulin hypoglycemia had a higher incidence of events of minor hypoglycemia (1.72 vs 4.46 events per patient-year [ppy], respectively), nocturnal hypoglycemia (0.25 vs 1.09 events ppy, respectively), and severe hypoglycemia (<0.01 vs 0.04 events ppy, respectively) at final visit. Age (P < 0.047), body mass index (P < 0.001), a prior history of microvascular disease (P < 0.001), pre-insulin hypoglycemia (P < 0.001), increased number of oral hypoglycemic agents (OHAs; P < 0.001), OHA intensification (P < 0.001), and the use of glinides (P = 0.004) were all found to be independently associated with the occurrence of hypoglycemia during the study.

CONCLUSIONS:

Once-daily insulin detemir therapy was safe and effective, and rates of hypoglycemia were low. Concerns about hypoglycemia should not deter the initiation of basal insulin analogs.

© 2013 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

KEYWORDS:

ambulatory care; basal insulin; oral hypoglycemic agent; sulfonylurea; type 2 diabetes mellitus; 非卧床护理,基础胰岛素,口服降糖药,磺脲,2型糖尿病

PMID:
24103141
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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