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Pediatr Radiol. 2014 Feb;44(2):181-6. doi: 10.1007/s00247-013-2798-7. Epub 2013 Oct 6.

High success rates of sedation-free brain MRI scanning in young children using simple subject preparation protocols with and without a commercial mock scanner--the Diabetes Research in Children Network (DirecNet) experience.

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  • 1Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research, Stanford, CA, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The ability to lie still in an MRI scanner is essential for obtaining usable image data. To reduce motion, young children are often sedated, adding significant cost and risk.

OBJECTIVE:

We assessed the feasibility of using a simple and affordable behavioral desensitization program to yield high-quality brain MRI scans in sedation-free children.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

222 children (4-9.9 years), 147 with type 1 diabetes and 75 age-matched non-diabetic controls, participated in a multi-site study focused on effects of type 1 diabetes on the developing brain. T1-weighted and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) MRI scans were performed. All children underwent behavioral training and practice MRI sessions using either a commercial MRI simulator or an inexpensive mock scanner consisting of a toy tunnel, vibrating mat, and video player to simulate the sounds and feel of the MRI scanner.

RESULTS:

205 children (92.3%), mean age 7 ± 1.7 years had high-quality T1-W scans and 174 (78.4%) had high-quality diffusion-weighted scans after the first scan session. With a second scan session, success rates were 100% and 92.5% for T1-and diffusion-weighted scans, respectively. Success rates did not differ between children with type 1 diabetes and children without diabetes, or between centers using a commercial MRI scan simulator and those using the inexpensive mock scanner.

CONCLUSION:

Behavioral training can lead to a high success rate for obtaining high-quality T1-and diffusion-weighted brain images from a young population without sedation.

PMID:
24096802
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3946760
Free PMC Article
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