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Am J Clin Nutr. 2013 Nov;98(5):1282-8. doi: 10.3945/ajcn.113.059204. Epub 2013 Sep 11.

Potassium and fruit and vegetable intakes in relation to social determinants and access to produce in New York City.

Author information

  • 1Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT (EL), and the NYC Department of Health & Mental Hygiene, New York, NY (SY, CJC, KB, and SMK).

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Potassium-rich diets are inversely associated with blood pressure. Potassium intake before this study had not been objectively measured by using potassium excretion in a population-based sample in the United States.

OBJECTIVES:

The objectives of the analysis were to 1) report mean potassium excretion in a diverse urban population by using 24-h urine collections, 2) corroborate potassium excretion by using self-reported fruit and vegetable consumption, and 3) characterize associations between potassium excretion and socioeconomic indicators and access to produce.

DESIGN:

Participants were from the 2010 Community Health Survey Heart Follow-Up Study-a population-based study including data from 24-h urine collections. The final sample of 1656 adults was weighted to be representative of New York City (NYC) adults as a whole.

RESULTS:

Mean urinary potassium excretion was 2180 mg/d, and mean self-reported fruit and vegetable intake was 2.5 servings/d. Adjusted urinary potassium excretion was 21% lower in blacks than in whites (P < 0.001), 13% lower in non-college graduates than in college graduates (P < 0.001), and 9% lower in the lowest-income than in the highest-income group (P = 0.03). Potassium excretion was correlated with fruit and vegetable intake. Most NYC residents reported a <10-min walk to fresh fruit and vegetables; this indicator of access was not associated with potassium excretion or fruit and vegetable intake.

CONCLUSIONS:

Potassium intake is low in NYC adults, especially in lower socioeconomic groups. Innovative programs that increase fruit and vegetable intake may help increase dietary potassium and reduce hypertension-related disease. This trial is registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01889589.

PMID:
24025631
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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