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AJR Am J Roentgenol. 2013 Sep;201(3):W425-36. doi: 10.2214/AJR.12.10470.

Acetabular fractures: anatomic and clinical considerations.

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  • 1Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, 333 Cedar St, PO Box 208057, New Haven, CT 06520, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Classifying acetabular fractures can be an intimidating topic. However, it is helpful to remember that there are only three basic types of acetabular fractures: column fractures, transverse fractures, and wall fractures. Within this framework, acetabular fractures are classified into two broad categories: elementary or associated fractures. We will review the osseous anatomy of the pelvis and provide systematic approaches for reviewing both radiographs and CT scans to effectively evaluate the acetabulum.

CONCLUSION:

Although acetabular fracture classification may seem intimidating, the descriptions and distinctions discussed and shown in this article hopefully make the topic simpler to understand. Approach the task by recalling that there are only three basic types of acetabular fractures: column fractures (coronally oriented on CT images), transverse fractures (sagittally oriented on CT images), and wall fractures (obliquely oriented on CT images). We have provided systematic approaches for reviewing both conventional radiographs and CT scans to effectively assess the acetabulum. The clinical implications of the different fracture patterns have also been reviewed because it is critically important to include pertinent information for our clinical colleagues to provide the most efficient and timely clinical care.

PMID:
23971473
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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