Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Diabetes Care. 2013 Oct;36(10):2909-14. doi: 10.2337/dc13-0010. Epub 2013 Jun 11.

Reduced hypoglycemia and increased time in target using closed-loop insulin delivery during nights with or without antecedent afternoon exercise in type 1 diabetes.

Author information

  • 1Corresponding author: Jennifer L. Sherr, jennifer.sherr@yale.edu.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Afternoon exercise increases the risk of nocturnal hypoglycemia (NH) in subjects with type 1 diabetes. We hypothesized that automated feedback-controlled closed-loop (CL) insulin delivery would be superior to open-loop (OL) control in preventing NH and maintaining a higher proportion of blood glucose levels within the target blood glucose range on nights with and without antecedent afternoon exercise.

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS:

Subjects completed two 48-h inpatient study periods in random order: usual OL control and CL control using a proportional-integrative-derivative plus insulin feedback algorithm. Each admission included a sedentary day and an exercise day, with a standardized protocol of 60 min of brisk treadmill walking to 65-70% maximum heart rate at 3:00 p.m.

RESULTS:

Among 12 subjects (age 12-26 years, A1C 7.4±0.6%), antecedent exercise increased the frequency of NH (reference blood glucose<60 mg/dL) during OL control from six to eight events. In contrast, there was only one NH event each on nights with and without antecedent exercise during CL control (P=0.04 vs. OL nights). Overnight, the percentage of glucose values in target range was increased with CL control (P<0.0001). Insulin delivery was lower between 10:00 p.m. and 2:00 a.m. on nights after exercise on CL versus OL, P=0.008.

CONCLUSIONS:

CL insulin delivery provides an effective means to reduce the risk of NH while increasing the percentage of time spent in target range, regardless of activity level in the mid-afternoon. These data suggest that CL control could be of benefit to patients with type 1 diabetes even if it is limited to the overnight period.

PMID:
23757427
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3781513
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk