Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Elife. 2013 Jun 4;2:e00558. doi: 10.7554/eLife.00558.

Stapled Golgi cisternae remain in place as cargo passes through the stack.

Author information

  • 1Department of Cell Biology , Yale University School of Medicine , New Haven , United States.

Abstract

We have designed a membrane 'staple', which consists of membrane-anchored repeats of the trans-aggregating FM domain that face the lumen of the secretory pathway. In the presence of the disaggregating drug these proteins transit the secretory pathway. When the drug is removed these proteins form electron-dense plaques which we term staples. Unexpectedly, when initially positioned within the cis-Golgi, staples remained at the cis face of the Golgi even after many hours. By contrast, soluble FM-aggregates transited the Golgi. Staples and soluble aggregates placed in cis-Golgi cisternae therefore have different fates. Whereas the membrane staples are located in the flattened, stacked central regions of the cisternae, the soluble aggregates are in the dilated rims. This suggests that while the cisternae are static on the time scale of protein traffic, the dilated rims are mobile and progress in the cis → trans direction via a mechanism that we term 'Rim Progression'. DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00558.001.

KEYWORDS:

Golgi; Human; Membrane; Traffic

PMID:
23755362
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3673335
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for eLife Sciences Publications, Ltd Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk