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Am J Cardiol. 2013 Aug 15;112(4):488-92. doi: 10.1016/j.amjcard.2013.04.008. Epub 2013 May 11.

Procedural outcomes of revascularization of chronic total occlusion of native coronary arteries (from a multicenter United States registry).

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  • 1VA North Texas Healthcare System, Dallas, TX, USA.

Abstract

Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) of chronic total occlusions (CTOs) is a rapidly evolving area of interventional cardiology. We sought to examine the immediate procedural and in-hospital clinical outcomes of native coronary artery CTO PCI from a multicenter United States (US) registry. We retrospectively examined the procedural outcomes of 1,361 consecutive native coronary artery CTO PCIs performed at 3 US institutions from January 2006 to November 2011. Mean age was 65 ± 11 years, 85% of patients were men, 40% had diabetes, 37% had previous coronary artery bypass graft surgery, and 42% had previous PCI. The CTO target vessel was the right coronary artery (55%), circumflex (23%), left anterior descending artery (21%), and left main or bypass graft (1%). The retrograde approach was used in 34% of all procedures. The technical and procedural success rates were 85.5% and 84.2%, respectively. The mean procedural time, fluoroscopy time, and contrast utilization were 113 ± 61 minutes, 42 ± 29 minutes, and 294 ± 158 ml, respectively. In multivariate analysis, female gender, no previous coronary artery bypass surgery, and years since initiation of CTO PCI at each center were independent predictors of procedural success. Major complications occurred in 24 patients (1.8%). In conclusion, among selected US-based institutions with experienced operators, native coronary artery CTO PCI can be performed with high success and low major complication rates.

Published by Elsevier Inc.

PMID:
23672987
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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