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Biol Psychiatry. 2013 May 1;73(9):877-86. doi: 10.1016/j.biopsych.2013.01.014. Epub 2013 Feb 23.

Monetary reward processing in obese individuals with and without binge eating disorder.

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  • 1Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

An important step in obesity research involves identifying neurobiological underpinnings of nonfood reward processing unique to specific subgroups of obese individuals.

METHODS:

Nineteen obese individuals seeking treatment for binge eating disorder (BED) were compared with 19 non-BED obese individuals (OB) and 19 lean control subjects (LC) while performing a monetary reward/loss task that parses anticipatory and outcome components during functional magnetic resonance imaging. Differences in regional activation were investigated in BED, OB, and LC groups during reward/loss prospect, anticipation, and notification.

RESULTS:

Relative to the LC group, the OB group demonstrated increased ventral striatal and ventromedial prefrontal cortex activity during anticipatory phases. In contrast, the BED group relative to the OB group demonstrated diminished bilateral ventral striatal activity during anticipatory reward/loss processing. No differences were observed between the BED and LC groups in the ventral striatum.

CONCLUSIONS:

Heterogeneity exists among obese individuals with respect to the neural correlates of reward/loss processing. Neural differences in separable groups with obesity suggest that multiple, varying interventions might be important in optimizing prevention and treatment strategies for obesity.

Copyright © 2013 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PMID:
23462319
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3686098
Free PMC Article
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