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Am J Med. 2013 Jan;126(1):74.e11-7. doi: 10.1016/j.amjmed.2012.07.005.

A randomized trial of cognitive behavioral therapy in primary care-based buprenorphine.

Author information

  • 1Department of Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520-8093, USA. david.fiellin@yale.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the impact of cognitive behavioral therapy on outcomes in primary care, office-based buprenorphine/naloxone treatment of opioid dependence.

METHODS:

We conducted a 24-week randomized clinical trial in 141 opioid-dependent patients in a primary care clinic. Patients were randomized to physician management or physician management plus cognitive behavioral therapy. Physician management was brief, manual guided, and medically focused; cognitive behavioral therapy was manual guided and provided for the first 12 weeks of treatment. The primary outcome measures were self-reported frequency of illicit opioid use and the maximum number of consecutive weeks of abstinence from illicit opioids, as documented by urine toxicology and self-report.

RESULTS:

The 2 treatments had similar effectiveness with respect to reduction in the mean self-reported frequency of opioid use, from 5.3 days per week (95% confidence interval, 5.1-5.5) at baseline to 0.4 (95% confidence interval, 0.1-0.6) for the second half of maintenance (P<.001 for the comparisons of induction and maintenance with baseline), with no differences between the 2 groups (P=.96) or between the treatments over time (P=.44). For the maximum consecutive weeks of opioid abstinence there was a significant main effect of time (P<.001), but the interaction (P=.11) and main effect of group (P=.84) were not significant. No differences were observed on the basis of treatment assignment with respect to cocaine use or study completion.

CONCLUSIONS:

Among patients receiving buprenorphine/naloxone in primary care for opioid dependence, the effectiveness of physician management did not differ significantly from that of physician management plus cognitive behavioral therapy.

Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PMID:
23260506
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3621718
Free PMC Article
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