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Brain Behav Immun. 2013 Jul;31:197-204. doi: 10.1016/j.bbi.2012.10.008. Epub 2012 Oct 12.

Bupropion pre-treatment of endotoxin-induced depressive symptoms.

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  • 1Department of Psychiatry, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA.

Abstract

Increased levels of inflammatory cytokines may play a role in depression. Depressive symptoms can be induced in humans with administration of low-dose lipopolysaccharide (LPS; endotoxin), which activates the innate immune system and causes release of inflammatory cytokines. We previously found that pre-treatment with the serotonin reuptake inhibitor citalopram reduced LPS-induced fatigue and anhedonia. This is a follow-up study to determine whether LPS-induced symptoms could be reduced by pre-treatment with bupropion, a norepinephrine and dopamine reuptake inhibitor. In this double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, cross-over study, 10 healthy subjects received intravenous LPS (0.8 ng/kg) after oral pre-treatment with bupropion (75 mg twice a day) or placebo for 7 days. The Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS), the Profile of Mood States (POMS), and a visual analog scale (VAS) were used to measure depressive symptoms. Serum levels of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines were measured with electrochemiluminescence assays. The results of this study, which must be considered preliminary, showed that LPS administration was associated with (1) increase in serum levels of all cytokines and chemokines assayed; (2) increase in total MADRS score, mostly due to items 7 (lassitude) and 8 (anhedonia); (3) increase in fatigue; (4) decrease in vigor; and (5) decrease in social interest. Bupropion pre-treatment had no statistically significant effect on the innate immune response to LPS or on LPS-induced behavioral changes, suggesting that 1-week pre-treatment with bupropion does not inhibit LPS-induced fatigue and anhedonia, contrary to what was found previously with citalopram.

Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PMID:
23064079
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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