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J Clin Apher. 2012 Nov;27(5):235-41. doi: 10.1002/jca.21232. Epub 2012 May 7.

Successful collection and engraftment of autologous peripheral blood progenitor cells in poorly mobilized patients receiving high-dose granulocyte colony-stimulating factor.

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  • 1Section of Medical Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor (G-CSF) alone or in conjunction with chemotherapy is commonly used to mobilize hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC) into peripheral blood for progenitor cell harvest for autologous HPC transplantation. However, in up to 30% of patients, HPC are not effectively mobilized. In this study, we report the efficacy and safety profiles of a mobilization strategy using high-dose (up to 36 μg/kg) G-CSF in poorly mobilized patients.

STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS:

Retrospective medical record reviews were performed for 392 patients who underwent autologous peripheral blood progenitor cell collection. A total of 56 patients were given high-dose G-CSF due to very ineffective mobilization and 35 of these patients underwent autologous HPC transplantation. The efficacy of mobilization, apheresis collection, and infusion were reviewed and analyzed.

RESULTS:

More than 2.5 × 10(6) CD34/Kg were collected in 88% of patients (49 of 56) who were placed on high-dose G-CSF due to very ineffective mobilization. Of the 35 patients who underwent HPC transplantation using the progenitor cells that were mobilized with high-dose G-CSF due to very ineffective mobilization, all had rapid and complete neutrophil and platelet engraftment comparable with good mobilizers.

CONCLUSION:

We conclude that collection of HPC using hyperstimulation with G-CSF is an effective alternative approach for HPC harvest for poorly mobilized patients.

Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

PMID:
22566214
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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