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Obstet Gynecol. 2012 Mar;119(3):575-81. doi: 10.1097/AOG.0b013e3182460d9f.

Human papillomavirus vaccination history among women with precancerous cervical lesions: disparities and barriers.

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  • 1Yale School of Public Health and Connecticut Emerging Infections Program, New Haven, Connecticut 06520, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To estimate racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic differences in human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination history among women aged 18-27 years with precancerous cervical lesions diagnosed, barriers to vaccination, and timing of vaccination in relation to the abnormal cytology result that preceded the diagnosis of the cervical lesion.

METHODS:

High-grade cervical lesions are reportable conditions in Connecticut for public health surveillance. Telephone interviews and medical record reviews were conducted during 2008-2010 for women (n=269) identified through the surveillance registry.

RESULTS:

Overall, 43% of women reported history of one or more doses of HPV vaccine. The mean age at vaccination was 22 years. Publicly insured (77%) and uninsured (85%) women were more likely than privately insured women (48%) to report no history of vaccination (P<.05). Among unvaccinated women, being unaware of HPV vaccine was reported significantly more often among Hispanics than non-Hispanics (31% compared with 13%, P=.02) and among those with public or no insurance compared with those with private insurance (26% and 36% compared with 6%, P<.05 for both). The most commonly reported barrier was lack of provider recommendation (25%). Not having talked to a provider about vaccine was reported significantly more often among those with public compared with private insurance (41% compared with 18%, P<.001). Approximately 35% of women received vaccine after an abnormal cytology result; this occurred more frequently among African American women compared with white women (80% compared with 30%, P<.01).

CONCLUSION:

Catch-up vaccination strategies should focus on provider efforts to increase timely coverage among low-income and minority women.

PMID:
22353956
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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