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J Trauma Stress. 2012 Feb;25(1):86-93. doi: 10.1002/jts.21658. Epub 2012 Feb 10.

Partner violence perpetration and victimization and HIV risk behaviors in St. Petersburg, Russia.

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  • 1Yale School of Public Health, Division of Epidemiology of Microbial Diseases, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520-8034, USA.

Abstract

Whether intimate partner violence (IPV) perpetration and victimization are associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) risk behaviors is seldom investigated in Russia. The present study hypothesized that patients from a sexually transmitted infection center in Russia who perpetrated IPV or were victims of IPV would be more likely to have HIV risk behaviors including injection drug use, multiple partners, and inconsistent condom use than those who were not involved with IPV. We used a self-administered questionnaire to collect information from 381 patients on demographics, health status, injection drug use, sexual behaviors, and violence involving sexual partners between 2008 and 2009. After including sociodemographics, lifetime IPV perpetration was significantly associated with having had multiple sexual partners among male patients (odds ratio [OR] = 2.61, p < .05). IPV victimization was significantly associated with injection drug use among male and female patients (OR = 5.22, p < .05) and with inconsistent condom use among female patients (OR = 8.93, p < .05). IPV perpetration and victimization were common among male and female study participants and were associated with greater HIV risk behaviors. HIV prevention programs in Russia should address the risks associated with IPV among people at risk for HIV.

Copyright © 2012 International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies.

PMID:
22328312
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC4038165
Free PMC Article
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