Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Am J Pathol. 2012 Apr;180(4):1495-508. doi: 10.1016/j.ajpath.2011.12.021. Epub 2012 Feb 8.

Gene deletions and amplifications in human hepatocellular carcinomas: correlation with hepatocyte growth regulation.

Author information

  • 1Department of Pathology, Graduate School of Public Health, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15241, USA.

Abstract

Tissues from 98 human hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) obtained from hepatic resections were subjected to somatic copy number variation (CNV) analysis. Most of these HCCs were discovered in livers resected for orthotopic transplantation, although in a few cases, the tumors themselves were the reason for the hepatectomies. Genomic analysis revealed deletions and amplifications in several genes, and clustering analysis based on CNV revealed five clusters. The LSP1 gene had the most cases with CNV (46 deletions and 5 amplifications). High frequencies of CNV were also seen in PTPRD (21/98), GNB1L (18/98), KIAA1217 (18/98), RP1-1777G6.2 (17/98), ETS1 (11/98), RSU1 (10/98), TBC1D22A (10/98), BAHCC1 (9/98), MAML2 (9/98), RAB1B (9/98), and YIF1A (9/98). The existing literature regarding hepatocytes or other cell types has connected many of these genes to regulation of cytoskeletal architecture, signaling cascades related to growth regulation, and transcription factors directly interacting with nuclear signaling complexes. Correlations with existing literature indicate that genomic lesions associated with HCC at the level of resolution of CNV occur on many genes associated directly or indirectly with signaling pathways operating in liver regeneration and hepatocyte growth regulation.

Copyright © 2012 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PMID:
22326833
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3657620
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk