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Soc Work Ment Health. 2007 Jan 1;5(3/4):355-378.

Adapting a Family-Based HIV Prevention Program for HIV-Infected Preadolescents and Their Families: Youth, Families and Health Care Providers Coming Together to Address Complex Needs.

Author information

  • 1Mary McKay, PhD, is Professor of Social Work in Psychiatry & Community Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine. Megan Block, MPH, Claude Mellins, PhD, and Elizabeth Brackis-Cott, PhD, are affiliated with New York State Psychiatric Institute, HIV Center for Clinical and Behavioral Studies. Dorian E. Traube, CSW, Claudia Miranda, MSW, and Jennifer Petterson, MSW, are affiliated with the Columbia University School of Social Work. Desiree Minott, MPH, is affiliated with Harlem Hospital Center, Columbia University. Elaine J. Abrams, MD, is affiliated with Harlem Hospital Center, Columbia University.

Abstract

This article describes a family-based HIV prevention and mental health promotion program specifically designed to meet the needs of perinatally-infected preadolescents and their families. This project represents one of the first attempts to involve perinatally HIV-infected youth in HIV prevention efforts while simultaneously addressing their mental health and health care needs. The program, entitled CHAMP+ (Collaborative HIV Prevention and Adolescent Mental Health Project-Plus), focuses on: (1) the impact of HIV on the family; (2) loss and stigma associated with HIV disease; (3) HIV knowledge and understanding of health and medication protocols; (4) family communication about puberty, sexuality and HIV; (5) social support and decision making related to disclosure; and (6) parental supervision and monitoring related to sexual possibility situations, sexual risk taking behavior and management of youth health and medication. Findings from a preliminary evaluation of CHAMP+ with six families are presented along with a discussion of challenges related to feasibility and implementation within a primary health care setting for perinatally infected youth.

PMID:
20852676
[PubMed]
PMCID:
PMC2939450
Free PMC Article

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