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Drug Alcohol Depend. 2009 Jul 1;103(1-2):65-73. doi: 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2009.03.014. Epub 2009 May 5.

Women who abuse prescription opioids: findings from the Addiction Severity Index-Multimedia Version Connect prescription opioid database.

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  • 1Yale School of Public Health, Division of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, 60 College Street, New Haven, CT 06520-8034, USA. traci.c.green@yale.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Evidence suggests gender differences in abuse of prescription opioids. This study aimed to describe characteristics of women who abuse prescription opioids in a treatment-seeking sample and to contrast gender differences among prescription opioid abusers.

METHODS:

Data collected November 2005 to April 2008 derived from the Addiction Severity Index Multimedia Version Connect (ASI-MV Connect) database. Bivariate and multivariable logistic regression examined correlates of prescription opioid abuse stratified by gender.

RESULTS:

29,906 assessments from 220 treatment centers were included, of which 12.8% (N=3821) reported past month prescription opioid abuse. Women were more likely than men to report use of any prescription opioid (29.8% females vs. 21.1% males, p<0.001) and abuse of any prescription opioid (15.4% females vs. 11.1% males, p<0.001) in the past month. Route of administration and source of prescription opioids displayed gender-specific tendencies. Women-specific correlates of recent prescription opioid abuse were problem drinking, age <54, inhalant use, residence outside of West US Census region, and history of drug overdose. Men-specific correlates were age <34, currently living with their children, residence in the South and Midwest, hallucinogen use, and recent depression. Women prescription opioid abusers were less likely to report a pain problem although they were more likely to report medical problems than women who abused other drugs.

CONCLUSIONS:

Gender-specific factors should be taken into account in efforts to screen and identify those at highest risk of prescription opioid abuse. Prevention and intervention efforts with a gender-specific approach are warranted.

PMID:
19409735
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2696394
Free PMC Article
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